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By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Define a thermodynamic system, its boundary, and its surroundings
  • Explain the roles of all the components involved in thermodynamics
  • Define thermal equilibrium and thermodynamic temperature
  • Link an equation of state to a system

A thermodynamic system    includes anything whose thermodynamic properties are of interest. It is embedded in its surroundings    or environment    ; it can exchange heat with, and do work on, its environment through a boundary    , which is the imagined wall that separates the system and the environment ( [link] ). In reality, the immediate surroundings of the system are interacting with it directly and therefore have a much stronger influence on its behavior and properties. For example, if we are studying a car engine, the burning gasoline inside the cylinder of the engine is the thermodynamic system; the piston, exhaust system, radiator, and air outside form the surroundings of the system. The boundary then consists of the inner surfaces of the cylinder and piston.

Figure a illustrates the concept of a system. A boundary separates the system, inside the boundary, from the surroundings, outside the boundary. Figure b is a schematic illustration of an engine cylinder as an example of a specific system. The system is the gas inside the piston. The boundary consists of the cylinder body containing the gas and the piston that caps the cylinder at the top. The surroundings consist of everything outside the cylinder and above the piston.
(a) A system, which can include any relevant process or value, is self-contained in an area. The surroundings may also have relevant information; however, the surroundings are important to study only if the situation is an open system. (b) The burning gasoline in the cylinder of a car engine is an example of a thermodynamic system.

Normally, a system must have some interactions with its surroundings. A system is called an isolated or closed system    if it is completely separated from its environment—for example, a gas that is surrounded by immovable and thermally insulating walls. In reality, a closed system does not exist unless the entire universe is treated as the system, or it is used as a model for an actual system that has minimal interactions with its environment. Most systems are known as an open system    , which can exchange energy and/or matter with its surroundings ( [link] ).

Figure a is a photograph of a tea kettle on a stove. Steam is seen coming out of the nozzle of the kettle. Figure b is a photograph of a pressure cooker on a stove.
(a) This boiling tea kettle is an open thermodynamic system. It transfers heat and matter (steam) to its surroundings. (b) A pressure cooker is a good approximation to a closed system. A little steam escapes through the top valve to prevent explosion. (credit a: modification of work by Gina Hamilton)

When we examine a thermodynamic system, we ignore the difference in behavior from place to place inside the system for a given moment. In other words, we concentrate on the macroscopic properties of the system, which are the averages of the microscopic properties of all the molecules or entities in the system. Any thermodynamic system is therefore treated as a continuum that has the same behavior everywhere inside. We assume the system is in equilibrium    . You could have, for example, a temperature gradient across the system. However, when we discuss a thermodynamic system in this chapter, we study those that have uniform properties throughout the system.

Before we can carry out any study on a thermodynamic system, we need a fundamental characterization of the system. When we studied a mechanical system, we focused on the forces and torques on the system, and their balances dictated the mechanical equilibrium of the system. In a similar way, we should examine the heat transfer between a thermodynamic system and its environment or between the different parts of the system, and its balance should dictate the thermal equilibrium of the system. Intuitively, such a balance is reached if the temperature becomes the same for different objects or parts of the system in thermal contact, and the net heat transfer over time becomes zero.

Questions & Answers

A proton initially at rest falls through a p.d of 25000V. what speed does it gain?
Minister Reply
what is the reaction of heat on magnet
ORIZINO Reply
what is a physical significant of electric dipole moment .
PRANAB Reply
A dipole moment it's a mechanical electrical effect used in nature
Antonio
what is the uses of carbon brushes in generator
Malik Reply
at what temperature is the degree Fahrenheit equal to degree Celsius
Grace Reply
Celsius and Faharaneith are different, never equal
Antonio
find their liners express of n=a+b/T² ( plot graph n against T)
Donsmart Reply
Radio Stations often advertis "instant news,,if that meens you can hear the news the instant the radio announcer speaks it is the claim true? what approximate time interval is required for a message to travel from Cairo to Aswan by radio waves (500km) (Assume the waves Casbe detected at this range )
mahmod Reply
what is growth and decay
Pawan Reply
thevenin
Oladejo Reply
Can someone please predict the trajectory of a point charge in a uniform electric field????
erlinda Reply
what is deference between strong force and coulomb force
zahid Reply
so basically the electric lines or the field lines
zach Reply
it's the measure of the flow of an electric field through a certain area
zach Reply
What is electric flux
Pranju Reply
how to calculate the magnetic force if the B field is depend on the coordinate
Ivan Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, University physics volume 2. OpenStax CNX. Oct 06, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col12074/1.3
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