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Construct your own problem

These problems require students to construct the details of a problem, justify their starting assumptions, show specific steps in the problem’s solution, and finally discuss the meaning of the result. These types of problems relate well to both conceptual and analytical aspects of physics, emphasizing that physics must describe nature. Often they involve an integration of topics from more than one chapter. Unlike other problems, solutions are not provided since there is no single correct answer. Instructors should feel free to direct students regarding the level and scope of their considerations. Whether the problem is solved and described correctly will depend on initial assumptions.

Appendices

Appendix A: Atomic Masses
Appendix B: Selected Radioactive Isotopes
Appendix C: Useful Information
Appendix D: Glossary of Key Symbols and Notation

Acknowledgements

This text is based on the work completed by Dr. Paul Peter Urone in collaboration with Roger Hinrichs, Kim Dirks, and Manjula Sharma. We would like to thank the authors as well as the numerous professors (a partial list follows) who have contributed their time and energy to review and provide feedback on the manuscript. Their input has been critical in maintaining the pedagogical integrity and accuracy of the text.

Senior contributing authors

Dr. Paul Peter Urone
Dr. Roger Hinrichs, State University of New York, College at Oswego

Contributing authors

Dr. Kim Dirks, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Dr. Manjula Sharma, University of Sydney, Australia

Expert reviewers

Erik Christensen, P.E, South Florida Community College
Dr. Eric Kincanon, Gonzaga University
Dr. Douglas Ingram, Texas Christian University
Lee H. LaRue, Paris Junior College
Dr. Marc Sher, College of William and Mary
Dr. Ulrich Zurcher, Cleveland State University
Dr. Matthew Adams, Crafton Hills College, San Bernardino Community College District
Dr. Chuck Pearson, Virginia Intermont College

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Questions & Answers

Who can help me with dynamics?
ivan Reply
radiation amuses mee....
pau Reply
can someone enumerate the First and second law of thermodynamics
oladele Reply
Good
Abdul Reply
radiation of phones kept amazing me
Okugbesan Reply
f=m(v-u)/t
Adeleke Reply
I understand light is a range of wavelenghts from em spectrum, but Where do photons come from in particular, how it is emitted from the sun?
Ian Reply
F=ma
pierre Reply
please what is the formula for calculating Newton second law of motion?
Ogodo Reply
what is emotion
Lilian Reply
properties of transverse waves
Abiodun Reply
is visible light electromagnetic wave?
akash Reply
Visible light is a range of wavelengths within the electro magnetic spectrum.
Robert
It is electro magnetic radiation from the sun.
Robert
please what is the formula for coefficient of kinetic friction
Seyi Reply
What is work
Sunbomustaphar Reply
1315.711980073m
babar Reply
what is thermo electric thermometer
Undie Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, College physics. OpenStax CNX. Jul 27, 2015 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11406/1.9
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