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Neoclassical economists will not tend to see aggregate demand as a useful tool for reducing unemployment; after all, if economic output is determined by a vertical aggregate supply curve , then aggregate demand has no long-run effect on unemployment. Instead, neoclassical economists believe that aggregate demand should be allowed to expand only to match the gradual shifts of aggregate supply to the right—keeping the price level much the same and inflationary pressures low.

If aggregate demand rises rapidly in the neoclassical model, in the long run it leads only to inflationary pressures. [link] shows a vertical LRAS curve and three different levels of aggregate demand, rising from AD 0 to AD 1 to AD 2 . As the macroeconomic equilibrium rises from E 0 to E 1 to E 2 , the price level rises, but real GDP does not budge; nor does the rate of unemployment, which adjusts to its natural rate. Conversely, reducing inflation has no long-term costs, either. Think about [link] in reverse, as the aggregate demand curve shifts from AD 2 to AD 1 to AD 0 , and the equilibrium moves from E 2 to E 1 to E 0 . During this process, the price level falls, but, in the long run, neither real GDP nor the natural rate of unemployment is changed.

How aggregate demand determines the price level in the long run

The graph shows three aggregate demand curves that all intersect with the vertical potential GDP line at around 62 on the x-axis, but at different price levels.
As aggregate demand shifts to the right, from AD 0 to AD 1 to AD 2 , real GDP in this economy and the level of unemployment do not change. However, there is inflationary pressure for a higher price level as the equilibrium changes from E 0 to E 1 to E 2 .

Visit this website to read about how inflation and unemployment are related.

Fighting recession or encouraging long-term growth?

Neoclassical economists believe that the economy will rebound out of a recession or eventually contract during an expansion because prices and wage rates are flexible and will adjust either upward or downward to restore the economy to its potential GDP. Thus, the key policy question for neoclassicals is how to promote growth of potential GDP. We know that economic growth ultimately depends on the growth rate of long-term productivity. Productivity measures how effective inputs are at producing outputs. We know that U.S. productivity has grown on average about 2% per year. That means that the same amount of inputs produce 2% more output than the year before. We also know that productivity growth varies a great deal in the short term due to cyclical factors. It also varies somewhat in the long term. From 1953–1972, U.S. labor productivity (as measured by output per hour in the business sector) grew at 3.2% per year. From 1973–1992, productivity growth declined significantly to 1.8% per year. Then, from 1993–2014, productivity growth increased slightly to 2% per year. The neoclassical economists believe the underpinnings of long-run productivity growth to be an economy’s investments in human capital, physical capital, and technology, operating together in a market-oriented environment that rewards innovation. Promotion of these factors is what government policy should focus on.

Summary of neoclassical macroeconomic policy recommendations

Let’s summarize what neoclassical economists recommend for macroeconomic policy. Neoclassical economists do not believe in “fine-tuning” the economy. They believe that economic growth is fostered by a stable economic environment with a low rate of inflation. Similarly, tax rates should be low and unchanging. In this environment, private economic agents can make the best possible investment decisions, which will lead to optimal investment in physical and human capital as well as research and development to promote improvements in technology.

Summary of neoclassical economics versus keynesian economics

[link] summarizes the key differences between the two schools of thought.

Neoclassical versus keynesian economics
Summary Neoclassical Economics Keynesian Economics
Focus: long-term or short term Long-term Short-term
Prices and wages: sticky or flexible? Flexible Sticky
Economic output: Primarily determined by aggregate demand or aggregate supply? Aggregate supply Aggregate demand
Aggregate supply: vertical or upward-sloping? Vertical Upward-sloping
Phillips curve vertical or downward-sloping Vertical Downward sloping
Is aggregate demand a useful tool for controlling inflation? Yes Yes
What should be the primary area of policy emphasis for reducing unemployment? Reform labor market institutions to reduce natural rate of unemployment Increase aggregate demand to eliminate cyclical unemployment
Is aggregate demand a useful tool for ending recession? At best, only in the short-run temporary sense, but may just increase inflation instead Yes

Key concepts and summary

Neoclassical economists tend to put relatively more emphasis on long-term growth than on fighting recession, because they believe that recessions will fade in a few years and long-term growth will ultimately determine the standard of living. They tend to focus more on reducing the natural rate of unemployment caused by economic institutions and government policies than the cyclical unemployment caused by recession.

Neoclassical economists also see no social benefit to inflation. With an upward-sloping Keynesian AS curve, inflation can arise because an economy is approaching full employment. With a vertical long-run neoclassical AS curve, inflation does not accompany any rise in output. If aggregate supply is vertical, then aggregate demand does not affect the quantity of output. Instead, aggregate demand can only cause inflationary changes in the price level. A vertical aggregate supply curve, where the quantity of output is consistent with many different price levels, also implies a vertical Phillips curve.

References

American Statistical Association. “ASA Headlines.” http://www.amstat.org/.

Haubrich, Joseph G., George Pennacchi, and Peter Ritchken. “Working Paper 11-07: Inflation Expectations, Real Rates, and Risk Premia: Evidence from Inflation Swaps.” Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland . Last modified March 2011. http://www.clevelandfed.org/research/workpaper/2011/wp1107.pdf.

University of Michigan: Institute for Social Research. “Survey Research Center.” http://www.src.isr.umich.edu/.

Questions & Answers

What is unemployment
Mijash Reply
Unemployment is a term used to describe people who do not hold a paying job
JASON
what are the causes of unemployment
evans
unemployment refer to the situation in which people searching job but they have no. it also refers in which marginal productivity in zero.
Ramu
Causes of unemployment are: 1: Over Population 2: Break down of the family system 3: Rural/Urban Migration
Umar
suppose you're the economist of ethiopia; when the country is face high rate of inflation what you recommend as one economist?
Roba Reply
if consumer spend all their incomes on consumption what does it mean?
Roba
if the government spends more of its revenue on development infrastructure from the budget it have and lower tax collection the budget deficit will run why?
Roba
because tax is less than revenue
Bhat
what is demand
Sunday Reply
Demand is the quantity of goods and services that consumers are willing and able to purchase at various prices over a given period of time
adu
the total value of goods and services produced by a coutry in it's own territorial area( mainly in a year) is called GDP
fareeha Reply
GDP- the total value of goods produced and services provided in a country during one year.
fareeha
What is the formula for propensity to save
Zubair
there is no formula for propensity to save but it has a two types one is average propensity to save and marginal propensity to save where Apc is equal to saving divide by income and mpc is equal to change in saving due change in income
Bhat
yes ooo
Sunday
yes
Ahmed
okay
kawu
what is time in economics?
Sunday
what is gross domestic product
Moonga Reply
what is macroeconomics
Dickison Reply
what is macroeconomics
Majid Reply
what is macroeconomic analysis
Deogratius Reply
Macroeconomics is a branch of the economics that studies how the aggregate economy behaves. In macroeconomics, a variety of economy-wide phenomena is thoroughly examined such as inflation, price levels, rate of growth, national income, gross domestic product (GDP) and changes in unemployment Read m
wasay
Macroeconomics is a branch of the economics that studies how the aggregate economy behaves. In macroeconomics, a variety of economy-wide phenomena is thoroughly examined such as inflation, price levels, rate of growth, national income, gross domestic product (GDP) and changes in unemployment
wasay
what is wage in economics?
Sunday
what is economic
Wajeed Reply
Economics is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Economics focuses on the behaviour and interactions of economic agents and how economies work. 
ninad
Economics is the brench of science that deals with the study of human behavior as it related to end or scare means which have alternative used.
Jimmy
what is inflation
Junaid Reply
Inflation is simply a situation in an economy where there is a persistent rise or increase in the prices of goods and services in a particular year(say current year)
JERRY
It can still be defined as a situation in an economy where there's a persistent fall in the value of money
JERRY
it is the persistent rise in the general price of goods and services in an economy leading to the fall in the values of money
Muafue
It could mean the central bank has a deficit in reserve unable to cope with low export and exit of foreign investments.
Wong
inflation is the general increase in a commodity with in a country.
Jimmy
Mr Fallah please take the definition again that one is not clear
Muafue
the persistence in general price of commodities
ezechy
The persistence rise in the general price level
Muafue
what is willingness
Bilal Reply
Is a person Able,Capable and Anxious to something
Muafue
Is when a person is able,capable and Anxious to do something
Muafue
thanks sir g.
Bilal
u are welcome
Muafue
where you from
Bilal
Cameroon
Muafue
And you
Muafue
Pakistan
Bilal
How far are you in Education
Muafue
who about my question What is MPC
sabawoon
is marginal propensity to consume
Muafue
a little more
sabawoon
sorry muafue sir you are little bit wrong about willingness *willingness reffers how much wants . it could be wants for payment or wants for something to do.
Masadaq
MPC reffers *How much want to consume*.
Masadaq
MPC is Marginal Propensity to Consume. MPC is proportion of additional spent on consumption.
Bon
MPC is Marginal Propensity to Consume. MPC is the proportion of additional income spent on consumption.
Bon
What is difference between GNP and GDP?
Zahid
GNP is gross national product. In calculating GNP we include net national income from abroad while GDP is gross domestic product and in calculating it we use on expenditure, income and output from within the country. My name is JERRY NGONDA from Cameron
JERRY
GNP.the total value of good $service currently produce w a given period of time by domestic owner GNP=NFI+GDP:GDP is a market value of final good $service currently produce in a given period of time w in a country boundery or territors.its take produce currently $etc
tade
yes.no suggestions
tade
good Tade Feyera
Masadaq
Tade Feyera can you send me your whatsap contact number.
Masadaq
when spending by the federal government exceeds net taxes?
stefany Reply
unemployed means people are not in the labor force, who have no job, are actively looking for job, they might be return to workforce.
tiffany Reply
the number of unemployed worker out of total number of people in workforce times 100
tiffany
Explain the necessity of studying macroeconomics.
mrinmoyee Reply
how is DDP calculated
sheikh Reply
the question is not understood
Muafue
whatis GDP
tade
what is demand?
Sunday

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Source:  OpenStax, Macroeconomics. OpenStax CNX. Jun 16, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11626/1.10
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