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The osteoblast    is the bone cell responsible for forming new bone and is found in the growing portions of bone, including the periosteum and endosteum. Osteoblasts, which do not divide, synthesize and secrete the collagen matrix and calcium salts. As the secreted matrix surrounding the osteoblast calcifies, the osteoblast become trapped within it; as a result, it changes in structure and becomes an osteocyte    , the primary cell of mature bone and the most common type of bone cell. Each osteocyte is located in a space called a lacuna and is surrounded by bone tissue. Osteocytes maintain the mineral concentration of the matrix via the secretion of enzymes. Like osteoblasts, osteocytes lack mitotic activity. They can communicate with each other and receive nutrients via long cytoplasmic processes that extend through canaliculi    (singular = canaliculus), channels within the bone matrix.

If osteoblasts and osteocytes are incapable of mitosis, then how are they replenished when old ones die? The answer lies in the properties of a third category of bone cells—the osteogenic cell    . These osteogenic cells are undifferentiated with high mitotic activity and they are the only bone cells that divide. Immature osteogenic cells are found in the deep layers of the periosteum and the marrow. They differentiate and develop into osteoblasts.

The dynamic nature of bone means that new tissue is constantly formed, and old, injured, or unnecessary bone is dissolved for repair or for calcium release. The cell responsible for bone resorption, or breakdown, is the osteoclast    . They are found on bone surfaces, are multinucleated, and originate from monocytes and macrophages, two types of white blood cells, not from osteogenic cells. Osteoclasts are continually breaking down old bone while osteoblasts are continually forming new bone. The ongoing balance between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is responsible for the constant but subtle reshaping of bone. [link] reviews the bone cells, their functions, and locations.

Bone Cells
Cell type Function Location
Osteogenic cells Develop into osteoblasts Deep layers of the periosteum and the marrow
Osteoblasts Bone formation Growing portions of bone, including periosteum and endosteum
Osteocytes Maintain mineral concentration of matrix Entrapped in matrix
Osteoclasts Bone resorption Bone surfaces and at sites of old, injured, or unneeded bone

Compact and spongy bone

The differences between compact and spongy bone are best explored via their histology. Most bones contain compact and spongy osseous tissue, but their distribution and concentration vary based on the bone’s overall function. Compact bone is dense so that it can withstand compressive forces, while spongy (cancellous) bone has open spaces and supports shifts in weight distribution.

Compact bone

Compact bone is the denser, stronger of the two types of bone tissue ( [link] ). It can be found under the periosteum and in the diaphyses of long bones, where it provides support and protection.

Diagram of compact bone

A generic long bone is shown at the top of this illustration. The bone is split in half lengthwise to show its internal anatomy. The outer gray covering of the bone is labeled the periosteum. Within the periosteum is a thin layer of compact bone. The compact bone surrounds a central cavity called the medullary cavity. The medullary cavity is filled with spongy bone at the two epiphyses. A callout box shows that the main image is zooming in on the compact bone on the left side of the bone. On the main image, the periosteum is being peeled back to show its two layers. The outer layer of the periosteum is the outer fibrous layer. This layer has a periosteal artery and a periosteal vein running along its outside edge. The inner layer of the periosteum is labeled the inner osteogenic layer. The compact bone lies to the right of the periosteum and occupies the majority of the main image. Two flat layers of compact bone line the inner surface of the ostegenic periosteum. These sheets of compact bone are called the circumferential lamellae. The majority of the compact bone has lamellae running perpendicular to that of the circumferential lamellae. These concentric lamellae are arranged in a series of concentric tubes. There are small cavities between the layers of concentric lamellae called lacunae. The centermost concentric lamella surrounds a hollow central canal. A blue vein, a red artery, a yellow nerve and a green lymph vessel run vertically through the central canal. A set of concentric lamellae, its associated lacunae and the vessels and nerves of the central canal are collectively called an osteon. The front edge of the diagram shows a longitudinal cross section of one of the osteons. The vessels and nerve are visible running through the center of the osteon throughout its length. In addition, blood vessels can run from the periosteum through the sides of the osteons and connect with the vessels of the central canal. The blood vessels travel through the sides of the osteons via a perforating canal. The open areas between neighboring osteons are also filled with compact bone. This “filler” bone is referred to as the interstitial lamellae. At the far right of the compact bone, the edge of the spongy bone is visible. The spongy bone is a series of crisscrossing bony arches called trabeculae. There are many open spaces between the trabeculae, giving the spongy bone its sponge-like appearance.
(a) This cross-sectional view of compact bone shows the basic structural unit, the osteon. (b) In this micrograph of the osteon, you can clearly see the concentric lamellae and central canals. LM × 40. (Micrograph provided by the Regents of University of Michigan Medical School © 2012)

Questions & Answers

i thought a cell is the fuctional unit of an orgarnism.
mutesi Reply
yes
Chidiebere
Explain the major features and properties of the cell membrane
Robina Reply
contants ofa lipid bilayers w the enbedded proteins it is faction of the cell membaren
bariise
it is made up of protein,fat and a small portion of carbohydrates. it is semipermeable but impermeable to uncharged water molecules.
Chidiebere
Describe an experiment to verify the law of constant composition
Ssekamatte
thanks
Momoh
how
Momoh
wow
Arshad
how
christopher
amazing the exprement is hard to set up can you please help us describe it for us?
Momoh
What are blood vessels of will's circle
Madu Reply
vertebral arteries and cerebral arteries
Chidiebere
What are sutures of cranial cavity ?
Madu Reply
there are four. the coronal, sagittal, squamous and lambhoidal sutured
Chidiebere
structure of a cell
Robina
pelvic cavity contents?
unimarwat Reply
ilium ,ischium ,pubis
Madu
but that is the three parts of the hip bone
Chidiebere
Describe the muscular skeletal system in terms of definition.. Skeleton Apendicular skeleton Axial skeleton Joints
Sherrine Reply
the basic framework of body made and cartilage is called skeleton skeleton which form limbs is called appendicular skeleton skeleton which form main axis of body is called axial skeleton the points at two or more bones meets is called joints
unimarwat
write short notes on ligaments,curves and moverment of vertebral column.
mutesi Reply
cranial nerves notes
unimarwat
what is the Analysis
ROHIT Reply
what is Anatomy
ROHIT Reply
it's a organs and bouns reading
AJITH
Cutting Up
Nonie
Cutting Up
Nonie
to dissect
Nonie
what usually cause blood pressurae
Abdullateef Reply
too much salt in the diet
Abuusu
older age
Abuusu
Even family history of high blood pressure
Abuusu
yes
Yaqub
too much salt in the diet
Yaqub
stress is the leading factor
Richard
smoking and too much alcohol consumption
Annu
obesity can also cause hypertension
Yaqub
high temperature of the body high salt of the body
Drs
how does the temperature affect the blood pressure?
Chidiebere
sex
Onavwie
What sex.?
Arshad
Male
Vikas
i mearnt gender,there's increased blood pressure in male than female
Onavwie
guys, read the question, involuntary pumping of heart causes the blood pressure in the arteries, he has not asked about high or low BP.
Jess
explain the cellular mechanism that produces tetanus and summation
Jenica Reply
epithelial cells polerity
jitendra Reply
tissues
Deepak
demonstrate the fluid replacement in the body
John Reply
the red blood cells is in the long bones or flat bones?
isbii
as age increases, the bone elongates .. will the joint vanish?
Sushruth Reply
what is anatomy?
Ivy Reply
structure
Allonda

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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