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Pedagogical foundation and features

Biology is grounded on a solid scientific base and designed to help students understand the concepts at hand. Throughout the text, one can explore features that engage the students in scientific inquiry by taking selected topics a step further. Our features include:

  • Evolution Connection features uphold the importance of evolution to all biological study through discussions like “The Evolution of Metabolic Pathways” and “Algae and Evolutionary Paths to Photosynthesis.”
  • Scientific Method Connection call-outs walk students through actual or thought experiments that elucidate the steps of the scientific process as applied to the topic. Features include “Determining the Time Spent in Cell Cycle Stages” and “Testing the Hypothesis of Independent Assortment.”
  • Career Connection features present information on a variety of careers in the biological sciences, introducing students to the educational requirements and day-to-day work life of a variety of professions, such as microbiologist, ecologist, neurologist, and forensic scientist.
  • Everyday Connection features tie biological concepts to emerging issues and discuss science in terms of everyday life. Topics include “Chesapeake Bay” and “Can Snail Venom Be Used as a Pharmacological Pain Killer?”

Art and animations that engage

Our art program takes a straightforward approach designed to help students learn the concepts of biology through simple, effective illustrations, photos, and micrographs. Biology also incorporates links to relevant animations and interactive exercises that help bring biology to life for students.

  • Art Connection features call out core figures in each chapter for student study. Questions about key figures, including clicker questions that can be used in the classroom, engage students’ critical thinking and analytical abilities to ensure their genuine understanding.
  • Link to Learning features direct students to online interactive exercises and animations to add a fuller context and examples to core content.

About our team

Biology would not be possible if not for the tremendous contributions of the authors and community reviewing team.

Senior contributing authors

Yael Avissar Rhode Island College Cell Biology
Jung Choi Georgia Institute of Technology Genetics
Jean DeSaix University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Evolution
Vladimir Jurukovski Suffolk County Community College Animal Physiology
Robert Wise University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Plant Biology
Connie Rye east Mississippi Community College General Content Lead

Contributing authors and reviewers

Julie Adams Aurora University
Summer Allen Brown University
James Bader Case Western Reserve University
David Bailey St. Norbert College
Mark Belk Brigham Young University
Nancy Boury Iowa State University
Lisa Bonneau Metropolitan Community College - Blue River
Graciela Brelles-Marino California State University Pomona
Mark Browning Purdue University
Sue Chaplin University of St. Thomas
George Cline Jacksonville State University
Deb Cook Georgia Gwinnett College
Diane Day Clayton State University
Frank Dirrigl The University of Texas - Pan American
Waneene Dorsey Grambling State University
Nick Downey University of Wisconsin La Crosse
Rick Duhrkopf Baylor University
Kristy Duran Adams State University
Stan Eisen Christian Brothers University
Brent Ewers University of Wyoming
Myriam Feldman Lake Washington Institute of Technology
Michael Fine Virginia Commonwealth University
Linda Flora Delaware County Community College
Thomas Freeland Walsh University
David Grisé Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi
Andrea Hazard SUNY Cortland
Michael Hedrick University of North Texas
Linda Hensel Mercer University
Mark Kopeny University of Virginia
Norman Johnson University of Massachusetts - Amherst
Grace Lasker Lake Washington Institute of Technology; Walden University
Sandy Latourelle SUNY Plattsburgh
Theo Light Shippensburg University
Clark Lindgren Grinnell College
James Malcolm University of Redlands
Mark Meade Jacksonville State University
Richard Merritt Houston Community College
James Mickle North Carolina State University
Jasleen Mishra Houston Community College
Dudley Moon Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Shobhana Natarajan Brookhaven College
Jonas Okeagu Fayetteville State University
Diana Oliveras University of Colorado Boulder
John Peters College of Charleston
Joel Piperberg Millersville University
Johanna Porter-Kelley Winston-Salem State university
Robyn Puffenbarger Bridgewater College
Dennis Revie California Lutheran University
Ann Rushing Baylor University
Sangha Saha City College of Chicago
Edward Saiff Ramapo College of New Jersey
Brian Shmaefsky Lone Star College System
Robert Sizemore Alcorn State University
Marc Smith Sinclair Community College
Frederick Spiegel University of Arkansas
Frederick Sproull La Roche College
Bob Sullivan Marist College
Mark Sutherland Hendrix College
Toure Thompson Alabama A&M University
Scott Thomson University of Wisconsin - Parkside
Allison van de Meene University of Melbourne
Mary White Southeastern Louisiana University
Steven Wilt Bellarmine University
James Wise Hampton University
Renna Wolfe
Virginia Young Mercer University
Leslie Zeman University of Washington
Daniel Zurek Pittsburg State University
Shobhana Natarajan Alcon Laboratories, Inc.

Learning resources

  • Wiley Plus for Biology-Fall 2013 Pilot
    WileyPLUS provides an engaging online environment for effective teaching and learning. WileyPLUS builds students’ confidence because it takes the guesswork out of studying by providing a clear roadmap; what to do, how to do it, and if they did it right. With WileyPLUS, students take more initiative. Therefore, the course has a greater impact on their learning experience. Adaptive tools provide students with a personal, adaptive learning experience so they can build their proficiency on topics and use their study time most effectively. Please let us know if you would like to participate in a Fall 2013 Pilot.
  • Biology Powerpoint Slides (faculty only)
    The PowerPoint slides are based on the extensive illustrations from Biology. They can be edited, incorporated into lecture notes, and you are free to share with anyone in the community. This is a restricted item requiring faculty registration. NOTE: This file is very large and may take some time to download.
  • SimBio (Laboratory)
    SimBio’s interactive modules (virtual labs and interactive tutorials and chapters) provide engaging, discovery-based learning tools that complement many of the chapters of Biology. SimBio is best known for their EcoBeaker® and EvoBeaker® suites of simulated ecology and evolution laboratories that guide students through the “discovery” of important concepts via a mix of structured and open-ended experimentation on simulated systems. In response to popular demand, SimBio has begun applying the same powerful approaches to topics in cell biology, genetics, and neurobiology. All of SimBio’s modules include instant-feedback questions that enhance student comprehension and auto-graded questions that facilitate implementation.

Questions & Answers

the properties of life
Clarinda Reply
response to the environment, reproduction, homeostasis, growth,energy processing etc.....
Pushpam
hello.
Daniela
hi
MacPeter
a complete virus particle known as
Darlington Reply
These are formed from identical protein subunitscalled capsomeres.
Pushpam
fabace family plant name
Pushpam Reply
in eukaryotes ...protein channel name which transport protein ...
Pushpam Reply
in bacteria ...chromosomal dna duplicate structure called
Pushpam
what is a prokaryotic cell and a eukaryotic cell
Matilda Reply
There are two types of cells. Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic cells. Prokaryotic cells don't have a nucleus or membrane enclosed organelles (little organs within that cell). They do however carry genetic material but it's not maintained in the nucleus. Prokaryotic cells are also one celled.
juanita
Prokaryotic cells are one celled (single celled).
juanita
Prokaryotic cells are Bacteria and Archea
juanita
Prokaryotic cells are smaller than Eukaryotic cells.
juanita
Eukaryotic cells are more complex. They are much bigger than Prokaryotic cells.
juanita
Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus and membrane bound organelles.
juanita
Eukaryotic cells are animals cells which also includes us.
juanita
Eukaryotic cells are also multicellular.
juanita
nice explaination
Amna
eukaryotic cells are individual cells .. but eukaryotes are multicellular organisms which consist of many different types of eukaryotic cells
Will
also eukaryotic cells have mitochondria. prokaryotic cells do not
Will
Good
John
in prokaryotes only ribosomes are present... in eukaryotes mitochondria ...glogi bodies ..epidermis .....prokaryotes one envelop but eukaryotes compartment envelop....envelop mean membrane bound organelles......
Pushpam
prokaryotic cell are cells dat have no true nuclei i.e no cell membrane while eukaryotic cell are cell dat have true nuclei i.e have cell membrane
Divine
we have 46 pair of somatic cell and 23 pair of chromosomes in our body, pls can someone explain it to me. pls
Matilda Reply
we have 22 pairs of somatic chromosomes and one pair of sex chromosome
Amna
thanks
Matilda
we have 23 pairs of chromosomes,22 pairs of somatic and one pair of sex chromosomes
Amna
23 chromosomes from dad & 23 chromosomes from mom 23 +23=46 total chromosomes
juanita
X & Y chromosomes are called sex cells, the very presence of a Y chromosome means the person is Male.
juanita
XX Female XY Male
juanita
If a Karyotype has more than 46 Chromosomes then nondisjunction occured. For example, having an extra chromosome 21 will cause Down Syndrome.
juanita
in mammal state the different vertebrae and their location in the body
Igbinigie Reply
what is a somatic cell
Senam Reply
somatic cells are body cells
juanita
somatic cell organised whole plant body part
Pushpam
what is biology
lilian Reply
what is biology
Dada Reply
The scientific study of life.
juanita
the study of life
Clarinda
the virus that causes mumps in humans is composed of a protein outer Shell containing a core of DNA
Daniel Reply
Basic science and applied science question about cancer
Joyce Reply
what are the importance of ATPs
Olatunji Reply
How can biology be studied from a microscopic approach to a global approach
Joyce Reply
The large central opening in the poriferan body is called
Chynna Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, Biology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 29, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11448/1.10
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