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Due to the comprehensive nature of the material, we are offering the book in three volumes for flexibility and efficiency.

Coverage and scope

Our University Physics textbook adheres to the scope and sequence of most two- and three-semester physics courses nationwide. We have worked to make physics interesting and accessible to students while maintaining the mathematical rigor inherent in the subject. With this objective in mind, the content of this textbook has been developed and arranged to provide a logical progression from fundamental to more advanced concepts, building upon what students have already learned and emphasizing connections between topics and between theory and applications. The goal of each section is to enable students not just to recognize concepts, but to work with them in ways that will be useful in later courses and future careers. The organization and pedagogical features were developed and vetted with feedback from science educators dedicated to the project.

VOLUME I

Unit 1: Mechanics

  • Chapter 1: Units and Measurement
  • Chapter 2: Vectors
  • Chapter 3: Motion Along a Straight Line
  • Chapter 4: Motion in Two and Three Dimensions
  • Chapter 5: Newton’s Laws of Motion
  • Chapter 6: Applications of Newton’s Laws
  • Chapter 7: Work and Kinetic Energy
  • Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy
  • Chapter 9: Linear Momentum and Collisions
  • Chapter 10: Fixed-Axis Rotation
  • Chapter 11: Angular Momentum
  • Chapter 12: Static Equilibrium and Elasticity
  • Chapter 13: Gravitation
  • Chapter 14: Fluid Mechanics

Unit 2: Waves and Acoustics

  • Chapter 15: Oscillations
  • Chapter 16: Waves
  • Chapter 17: Sound

VOLUME II

Unit 1: Thermodynamics

  • Chapter 1: Temperature and Heat
  • Chapter 2: The Kinetic Theory of Gases
  • Chapter 3: The First Law of Thermodynamics
  • Chapter 4: The Second Law of Thermodynamics

Unit 2: Electricity and Magnetism

  • Chapter 5: Electric Charges and Fields
  • Chapter 6: Gauss’s Law
  • Chapter 7: Electric Potential
  • Chapter 8: Capacitance
  • Chapter 9: Current and Resistance
  • Chapter 10: Direct-Current Circuits
  • Chapter 11: Magnetic Forces and Fields
  • Chapter 12: Sources of Magnetic Fields
  • Chapter 13: Electromagnetic Induction
  • Chapter 14: Inductance
  • Chapter 15: Alternating-Current Circuits
  • Chapter 16: Electromagnetic Waves

VOLUME III

Unit 1: Optics

  • Chapter 1: The Nature of Light
  • Chapter 2: Geometric Optics and Image Formation
  • Chapter 3: Interference
  • Chapter 4: Diffraction

Unit 2: Modern Physics

  • Chapter 5: Relativity
  • Chapter 6: Photons and Matter Waves
  • Chapter 7: Quantum Mechanics
  • Chapter 8: Atomic Structure
  • Chapter 9: Condensed Matter Physics
  • Chapter 10: Nuclear Physics
  • Chapter 11: Particle Physics and Cosmology

Pedagogical foundation

Throughout University Physics you will find derivations of concepts that present classical ideas and techniques, as well as modern applications and methods. Most chapters start with observations or experiments that place the material in a context of physical experience. Presentations and explanations rely on years of classroom experience on the part of long-time physics professors, striving for a balance of clarity and rigor that has proven successful with their students. Throughout the text, links enable students to review earlier material and then return to the present discussion, reinforcing connections between topics. Key historical figures and experiments are discussed in the main text (rather than in boxes or sidebars), maintaining a focus on the development of physical intuition. Key ideas, definitions, and equations are highlighted in the text and listed in summary form at the end of each chapter. Examples and chapter-opening images often include contemporary applications from daily life or modern science and engineering that students can relate to, from smart phones to the internet to GPS devices.

Questions & Answers

V=E½-P-½ where v; velocity, P; density and E; constant. Find dimension and it's units of E (constant)
michael Reply
ML-3
LAWAL
derivation of simple harmonic equation
Daud Reply
if an equation is dimensionally correct does this mean that equation must be true?
michael Reply
how do I calculate angular velocity
Priscilla Reply
w=vr where w, angular velocity. v; velocity and r; radius of a circle
michael
sorry I meant Maximum positive angular velocity of
Priscilla
please can u tell me the formular for tension in angular velocity I kind of forget it please don't ignore this msg I need it nw
sodeeq
Can any one give me the definition for Bending moment plz...
Prema Reply
I need a question for moment
paul Reply
what is charge
Zarshad
An attribution of particle that we have thought about to explain certain things like Electomagnetism
Nikunj
please what is the formula instantaneous velocity in projectile motion
Isaiah Reply
A computer is reading from a CD-ROM that rotates at 780 revolutions per minute.What is the centripetal acceleration at a point that is 0.030m from the center of the disc?
Rapqueen Reply
change revolution per minute by multiplying from 2pie and devide by 60.and take r=.030 and use formula centripital acceleration =omega sqare r.
Kumar
OK thank you
Rapqueen
observation of body boulded
Anwer Reply
a gas is compressed to 1/10 0f its original volume.calculate the rise temperature if the original volume is 400k. gamma =1.4
Celine Reply
the specific heat of hydrogen at constant pressure and temperature is 14.16kj|k.if 0.8kg of hydrogen is heated from 55 degree Celsius to 80 degree Celsius of a constant pressure. find the external work done .
Celine
hi
shaik
hy
Prasanna
g
Ahmad
what is imaginary mass and how we express is
Yash Reply
what is imaginary mass how we express it
Yash
centre of mass is also called as imaginary mass
Lokmani
l'm from Algeria and fell these can help me
Khlil Reply
Many amusement parks have rides that make vertical loops like the one shown below. For safety, the cars are attached to the rails in such a way that they cannot fall off. If the car goes over the top at just the right speed, gravity alone will supply the centripetal force. What other force acts and what is its direction if: (a) The car goes over the top at faster than this speed? (b) The car goes over the top at slower than this speed?
English Reply
how can I convert mile to meter per hour
Folorunsho Reply
1 mile * 1609m
Boon
hey can someone show me how to solve the - "Hanging from the ceiling over a baby bed ...." question
Shrushti Reply
i wanted to know the steps
Shrushti
sorry shrushti..
Rashid
which question please write it briefly
Asutosh

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Source:  OpenStax, University physics volume 1. OpenStax CNX. Sep 19, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col12031/1.5
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