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Introductory Statistics is intended for the one-semester introduction to statistics course for students who are not mathematics or engineering majors. It focuses on the interpretation of statistical results, especially in real world settings, and assumes that students have an understanding of intermediate algebra. In addition to end of section practice and homework sets, examples of each topic are explained step-by-step throughout the text and followed by a Try It problem that is designed as extra practice for students. This book also includes collaborative exercises and statistics labs designed to give students the opportunity to work together and explore key concepts. To support today’s student in understanding technology, this book features TI 83, 83+, 84, or 84+ calculator instructions at strategic points throughout. While the book has been built so that each chapter builds on the previous, it can be rearranged to accommodate any instructor’s particular needs.

About Introductory Statistics

This version of Introductory Statistics has been adapted by Nancy Chibry from the original version specifically for the one-semester Statistics 213 course at the University of Calgary. Introduction to statistics course and is geared toward students majoring in fields other than math or engineering. This text assumes students have been exposed to intermediate algebra, and it focuses on the applications of statistical knowledge rather than the theory behind it.

The foundation of this textbook is Collaborative Statistics , by Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean. Additional topics, examples, and ample opportunities for practice have been added to each chapter. The development choices for this textbook were made with the guidance of many faculty members who are deeply involved in teaching this course. These choices led to innovations in art, terminology, and practical applications, all with a goal of increasing relevance and accessibility for students. We strove to make the discipline meaningful, so that students can draw from it a working knowledge that will enrich their future studies and help them make sense of the world around them.

Pedagogical foundation and features

  • Examples are placed strategically throughout the text to show students the step-by-step process of interpreting and solving statistical problems. To keep the text relevant for students, the examples are drawn from a broad spectrum of practical topics; these include examples about college life and learning, health and medicine, retail and business, and sports and entertainment.
  • Try It practice problems immediately follow many examples and give students the opportunity to practice as they read the text. They are usually based on practical and familiar topics, like the Examples themselves .
  • Collaborative Exercises provide an in-class scenario for students to work together to explore presented concepts.
  • Using the TI-83, 83+, 84, 84+ Calculator shows students step-by-step instructions to input problems into their calculator.
  • The Technology Icon indicates where the use of a TI calculator or computer software is recommended.
  • Practice, Homework, and Bringing It Together problems give the students problems at various degrees of difficulty while also including real-world scenarios to engage students.

Statistics labs

These innovative activities were developed by Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean in order to offer students the experience of designing, implementing, and interpreting statistical analyses. They are drawn from actual experiments and data-gathering processes, and offer a unique hands-on and collaborative experience. The labs provide a foundation for further learning and classroom interaction that will produce a meaningful application of statistics.

Statistics Labs appear at the end of each chapter, and begin with student learning outcomes, general estimates for time on task, and any global implementation notes. Students are then provided step-by-step guidance, including sample data tables and calculation prompts. The detailed assistance will help the students successfully apply the concepts in the text and lay the groundwork for future collaborative or individual work.

About our team

Senior contributing authors

Barbara Illowsky De Anza College
Susan Dean De Anza College

Contributors

Abdulhamid Sukar Cameron University
Abraham Biggs Broward Community College
Adam Pennell Greensboro College
Alexander Kolovos
Andrew Wiesner Pennsylvania State University
Ann Flanigan Kapiolani Community College
Benjamin Ngwudike Jackson State University
Birgit Aquilonius West Valley College
Bryan Blount Kentucky Wesleyan College
Carol Olmstead De Anza College
Carol Weideman St. Petersburg College
Charles Ashbacher Upper Iowa University, Cedar Rapids
Charles Klein De Anza College
Cheryl Wartman University of Prince Edward Island
Cindy Moss Skyline College
Daniel Birmajer Nazareth College
David Bosworth Hutchinson Community College
David French Tidewater Community College
Dennis Walsh Middle Tennessee State University
Diane Mathios De Anza College
Ernest Bonat Portland Community College
Frank Snow De Anza College
George Bratton University of Central Arkansas
Inna Grushko De Anza College
Janice Hector De Anza College
Javier Rueda De Anza College
Jeffery Taub Maine Maritime Academy
Jim Helmreich Marist College
Jim Lucas De Anza College
Jing Chang College of Saint Mary
John Thomas College of Lake County
Jonathan Oaks Macomb Community College
Kathy Plum De Anza College
Larry Green Lake Tahoe Community College
Laurel Chiappetta University of Pittsburgh
Lenore Desilets De Anza College
Lisa Markus De Anza College
Lisa Rosenberg Elon University
Lynette Kenyon Collin County Community College
Mark Mills Central College
Mary Jo Kane De Anza College
Mary Teegarden San Diego Mesa College
Matthew Einsohn Prescott College
Mel Jacobsen Snow College
Michael Greenwich College of Southern Nevada
Miriam Masullo SUNY Purchase
Mo Geraghty De Anza College
Nydia Nelson St. Petersburg College
Philip J. Verrecchia York College of Pennsylvania
Robert Henderson Stephen F. Austin State University
Robert McDevitt Germanna Community College
Roberta Bloom De Anza College
Rupinder Sekhon De Anza College
Sara Lenhart Christopher Newport University
Sarah Boslaugh Kennesaw State University
Sheldon Lee Viterbo University
Sheri Boyd Rollins College
Sudipta Roy Kankakee Community College
Travis Short St. Petersburg College
Valier Hauber De Anza College
Vladimir Logvenenko De Anza College
Wendy Lightheart Lane Community College
Yvonne Sandoval Pima Community College

Sample ti technology

calculators
Disclaimer: The original calculator image(s) by Texas Instruments, Inc. are provided under CC-BY. Any subsequent modifications to the image(s) should be noted by the person making the modification. (Credit: ETmarcom TexasInstruments)

Questions & Answers

do you think it's worthwhile in the long term to study the effects and possibilities of nanotechnology on viral treatment?
Damian Reply
absolutely yes
Daniel
how to know photocatalytic properties of tio2 nanoparticles...what to do now
Akash Reply
it is a goid question and i want to know the answer as well
Maciej
characteristics of micro business
Abigail
Do somebody tell me a best nano engineering book for beginners?
s. Reply
what is fullerene does it is used to make bukky balls
Devang Reply
are you nano engineer ?
s.
fullerene is a bucky ball aka Carbon 60 molecule. It was name by the architect Fuller. He design the geodesic dome. it resembles a soccer ball.
Tarell
what is the actual application of fullerenes nowadays?
Damian
That is a great question Damian. best way to answer that question is to Google it. there are hundreds of applications for buck minister fullerenes, from medical to aerospace. you can also find plenty of research papers that will give you great detail on the potential applications of fullerenes.
Tarell
what is the Synthesis, properties,and applications of carbon nano chemistry
Abhijith Reply
Mostly, they use nano carbon for electronics and for materials to be strengthened.
Virgil
is Bucky paper clear?
CYNTHIA
so some one know about replacing silicon atom with phosphorous in semiconductors device?
s. Reply
Yeah, it is a pain to say the least. You basically have to heat the substarte up to around 1000 degrees celcius then pass phosphene gas over top of it, which is explosive and toxic by the way, under very low pressure.
Harper
Do you know which machine is used to that process?
s.
how to fabricate graphene ink ?
SUYASH Reply
for screen printed electrodes ?
SUYASH
What is lattice structure?
s. Reply
of graphene you mean?
Ebrahim
or in general
Ebrahim
in general
s.
Graphene has a hexagonal structure
tahir
On having this app for quite a bit time, Haven't realised there's a chat room in it.
Cied
what is biological synthesis of nanoparticles
Sanket Reply
what's the easiest and fastest way to the synthesize AgNP?
Damian Reply
China
Cied
types of nano material
abeetha Reply
I start with an easy one. carbon nanotubes woven into a long filament like a string
Porter
many many of nanotubes
Porter
what is the k.e before it land
Yasmin
what is the function of carbon nanotubes?
Cesar
I'm interested in nanotube
Uday
what is nanomaterials​ and their applications of sensors.
Ramkumar Reply
what is nano technology
Sravani Reply
what is system testing?
AMJAD
preparation of nanomaterial
Victor Reply
Yes, Nanotechnology has a very fast field of applications and their is always something new to do with it...
Himanshu Reply
good afternoon madam
AMJAD
what is system testing
AMJAD
what is the application of nanotechnology?
Stotaw
In this morden time nanotechnology used in many field . 1-Electronics-manufacturad IC ,RAM,MRAM,solar panel etc 2-Helth and Medical-Nanomedicine,Drug Dilivery for cancer treatment etc 3- Atomobile -MEMS, Coating on car etc. and may other field for details you can check at Google
Azam
anybody can imagine what will be happen after 100 years from now in nano tech world
Prasenjit
after 100 year this will be not nanotechnology maybe this technology name will be change . maybe aftet 100 year . we work on electron lable practically about its properties and behaviour by the different instruments
Azam
name doesn't matter , whatever it will be change... I'm taking about effect on circumstances of the microscopic world
Prasenjit
how hard could it be to apply nanotechnology against viral infections such HIV or Ebola?
Damian
silver nanoparticles could handle the job?
Damian
not now but maybe in future only AgNP maybe any other nanomaterials
Azam
Hello
Uday
I'm interested in Nanotube
Uday
this technology will not going on for the long time , so I'm thinking about femtotechnology 10^-15
Prasenjit
how did you get the value of 2000N.What calculations are needed to arrive at it
Smarajit Reply
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Source:  OpenStax, Introduction to statistics i - stat 213 - university of calgary - ver2015revb. OpenStax CNX. Oct 21, 2015 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11874/1.3
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