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The question of how to organize economic institutions is typically not a black-or-white choice between all market or all government, but instead involves a balancing act over the appropriate combination of market freedom and government rules.

Globalization

The image is a photograph of a cargo ship transporting goods.
Cargo ships are one mode of transportation for shipping goods in the global economy. (Credit: Raul Valdez/Flickr Creative Commons)

The rise of globalization

Recent decades have seen a trend toward globalization    , which is the expanding cultural, political, and economic connections between people around the world. One measure of this is the increased buying and selling of goods, services, and assets across national borders—in other words, international trade and financial capital flows.

Globalization has occurred for a number of reasons. Improvements in shipping, as illustrated by the container ship shown in [link] , and air cargo have driven down transportation costs. Innovations in computing and telecommunications have made it easier and cheaper to manage long-distance economic connections of production and sales. Many valuable products and services in the modern economy can take the form of information—for example: computer software; financial advice; travel planning; music, books and movies; and blueprints for designing a building. These products and many others can be transported over telephones and computer networks at ever-lower costs. Finally, international agreements and treaties between countries have encouraged greater trade.

[link] presents one measure of globalization. It shows the percentage of domestic economic production that was exported for a selection of countries from 2010 to 2013, according to an entity known as The World Bank. Exports are the goods and services that are produced domestically and sold abroad. Imports are the goods and services that are produced abroad and then sold domestically. The size of total production in an economy is measured by the gross domestic product (GDP)    . Thus, the ratio of exports divided by GDP measures what share of a country’s total economic production is sold in other countries.

(Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/)
The extent of globalization (exports/gdp)
Country 2010 2011 2012 2013
Higher Income Countries
United States 12.4 13.6 13.6 13.5
Belgium 76.2 81.4 82.2 82.8
Canada 29.1 30.7 30.0 30.1
France 26.0 27.8 28.1 28.3
Middle Income Countries
Brazil 10.9 11.9 12.6 12.6
Mexico 29.9 31.2 32.6 31.7
South Korea 49.4 55.7 56.3 53.9
Lower Income Countries
Chad 36.8 38.9 36.9 32.2
China 29.4 28.5 27.3 26.4
India 22.0 23.9 24.0 24.8
Nigeria 25.3 31.3 31.4 18.0

In recent decades, the export/GDP ratio has generally risen, both worldwide and for the U.S. economy. Interestingly, the share of U.S. exports in proportion to the U.S. economy is well below the global average, in part because large economies like the United States can contain more of the division of labor inside their national borders. However, smaller economies like Belgium, Korea, and Canada need to trade across their borders with other countries to take full advantage of division of labor, specialization, and economies of scale. In this sense, the enormous U.S. economy is less affected by globalization than most other countries.

Questions & Answers

what is demand
Prince Reply
what is market mechanism
thammy Reply
how do you find the marginal line given the input and output?
Greatson Reply
population density
Thompson Reply
what is monopoly
Thompson
what is elasticity of demand?
tunde Reply
Elasticity is a central concept in economic , and is applied in many situations. Elasticity can provide important information about the strength or weakness of such relationship. Elasticity refers to the responsiveness of one economic variable such as quantity demanded, to change in another variable
Lena
such as price. #Price elasticity of demand:which measure the responsiveness of the quantity demanded to a change in price. #cross elasticity of demand:which measure the responsiveness of quantity demanded of one good to a change in the price of another good.
Lena
what are variables
Lekan Reply
marginal cost
Seyi Reply
division of labour
Abdulmumeen Reply
explain Qd=601/3p
mahmud Reply
what is unemployment
Ernest Reply
what is the formula for average revenues
EMMANUEL Reply
please 7 implications of Lionel Robbins definition of economics
Amaka Reply
Problem of economics to the society
Gmzaeeyan Reply
Within 1 or 2 percentage points, what has the U.S. inflation rate been during the last 20 years? Draw a graph to show the data.
Daphne Reply
law of demand is explaining why the demand curve is downward sloping
Tan Reply
the graph would be x axis is quantity and y axis is price, as the price is expensive, there would be less demand therefore less quantity anf vice versa, thats why demand curve is downward sloping
Tan
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Source:  OpenStax, Principles of economics. OpenStax CNX. Sep 19, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11613/1.11
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