<< Chapter < Page
  Introductory statistics     Page 20 / 36
Chapter >> Page >

62 . What would be your decision, if you were using α = 0.01?

10.3: comparing two independent population proportions

Use the information to answer the next six exercises. You want to know if proportion of homes with cable television service differs between Community A and Community B. To test this, you draw a random sample of 100 for each and record whether they have cable service.

63 . What are the null and alternative hypotheses for this study

64 . If 65 households in Community A have cable service, and 78 households in community B, what is the pooled proportion?

65 . At α = 0.03, will you reject the null hypothesis? What is your conclusion? 65 households in Community A have cable service, and 78 households in community B. 100 households in each community were surveyed.

66 . Using an alpha value of 0.01, would you reject the null hypothesis? What is your conclusion? 65 households in Community A have cable service, and 78 households in community B. 100 households in each community were surveyed.

10.4: matched or paired samples

Use the following information to answer the next five exercises. You are interested in whether a particular exercise program helps people lose weight. You conduct a study in which you weigh the participants at the start of the study, and again at the conclusion, after they have participated in the exercise program for six months. You compare the results using a matched-pairs t-test, in which the data is {weight at conclusion – weight at start}. You believe that, on average, the participants will have lost weight after six months on the exercise program.

67 . What are the null and alternative hypotheses for this study?

68 . Calculate the test statistic, assuming that x ¯ d = –5, s d = 6, and n = 30 (pairs).

69 . What are the degrees of freedom for this statistic?

70 . Using α = 0.05, what is your decision regarding the effectiveness of this program in causing weight loss? What is the conclusion?

71 . What would it mean if the t -statistic had been 4.56, and what would have been your decision in that case?

11.1: facts about the chi-square distribution

72 . What is the mean and standard deviation for a chi-square distribution with 20 degrees of freedom?

11.2: goodness-of-fit test

Use the following information to answer the next four exercises. Nationally, about 66 percent of high school graduates enroll in higher education. You perform a chi-square goodness of fit test to see if this same proportion applies to your high school’s most recent graduating class of 200. Your null hypothesis is that the national distribution also applies to your high school.

73 . What are the expected numbers of students from your high school graduating class enrolled and not enrolled in higher education?

74 . Fill out the rest of this table.

Observed ( O ) Expected ( E ) O E ( O E )2 ( O E ) 2 z
Enrolled 145
Not enrolled 55

75 . What are the degrees of freedom for this chi-square test?

76 . What is the chi-square test statistic and the p -value. At the 5% significance level, what do you conclude?

77 . For a chi-square distribution with 92 degrees of freedom, the curve _____________.

Questions & Answers

how they find mean population
Joy Reply
parts of statistics
Edwin Reply
what is a mean?
Onele Reply
given the sequence 128,64,32 find the 12th term of the sequence
Shehu Reply
12th number is 0.0625
Thangarajan
why do we use summation notation to represent set of observations
MICHAEL Reply
what is the potential outlier ?
Anik Reply
A pharmaceutical company claims that their pain reliever capsule is 70% effective. But a clinical test on this capsule showed 65 out of 100 effectiveness
jelly Reply
Part of statistics
charls Reply
how to find mean population
Dawit Reply
what is data value
Ravneet Reply
what is relative frequency
Adeyemi Reply
liner regression analysis
Swathy Reply
Proper definition of outlier?
Sumbal Reply
Extraordinary observation (too distant, high, low etc)
Petr Reply
What is outlier?
Sumbal Reply

Get the best Introductory statistics course in your pocket!





Source:  OpenStax, Introductory statistics. OpenStax CNX. May 06, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11562/1.18
Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

Notification Switch

Would you like to follow the 'Introductory statistics' conversation and receive update notifications?

Ask