Introduction to Mechanics MCQ

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The objective of this session is to introduce the subject of software engineering. When you have read this session you will understand what software engineering is and why it is important, know the answers to key questions which provide an introduction to software engineering, understand ethical and professional issues which are important for software engineers.

Introduction

Virtually all countries now depend on complex computer-based systems. More and more products incorporate computers and controlling software in some form. The software in these systems represents a large and increasing proportion of the total system costs. Therefore, producing software in a cost-effective way is essential for the functioning of national and international economies.

Software engineering is an engineering discipline whose goal is the cost-effective development of software systems. Software is abstract and intangible. It is not constrained by materials, governed by physical laws or by manufacturing processes. In some ways, this simplifies software engineering as there are no physical limitations on the potential of software. In other ways, however, this lack of natural constraints means that software can easily become extremely complex and hence very difficult to understand.

Software engineering is still a relatively young discipline. The notion of ‘software engineering’ was first proposed in 1968 at a conference held to discuss what was then called the ‘software crisis’. This software crisis resulted directly from the introduction of powerful, third generation computer hardware. Their power made hitherto unrealisable computer applications a feasible proposition. The resulting software was orders of magnitude larger and more complex than previous software systems.

Early experience in building these systems showed that an informal approach to software development was not good enough. Major projects were sometimes years late. They cost much more than originally predicted, were unreliable, difficult to maintain and performed poorly. Software development was in crisis. Hardware costs were tumbling whilst software costs were rising rapidly. New techniques and methods were needed to control the complexity inherent in large software systems.

These techniques have become part of software engineering and are now widely although not universally used. However, there are still problems in producing complex software which meets user expectations, is delivered on time and to budget. Many software projects still have problems and this has led to some commentators (Pressman, 1997) suggesting that software engineering is in a state of chronic affliction.

As our ability to produce software has increased so too has the complexity of the software systems required. New technologies resulting from the convergence of computers and communication systems place new demands on software engineers. For this reason and because many companies do not apply software engineering techniques effectively, we still have problems. Things are not as bad as the doomsayers suggest but there is clearly room for improvement.


Physics 101 is the first course in the Introduction to Physics sequence. In general, the quest of physics is to develop descriptions of the natural world that correspond closely to actual observations. Given this definition, the story behind everything in the universe, from rocks falling to stars shining, is one of physics. In principle, the events of the natural world represent no more than the interactions of the elementary particles that comprise the material universe. In practice, however, it turns out to be more complicated than that.

As the system under study becomes more and more complex, it becomes less and less clear how the basic laws of physics account for the observations. Other branches of science, such as chemistry or biology, are needed. In principle, biology is based on the laws of chemistry, and chemistry is based on the laws of physics, but our ability to understand something as complex as life in terms of the laws of physics is well beyond our present knowledge. Physics is, however, the first rung on the ladder of our understanding of the physical universe.

In this course, we will study physics from the ground up, learning the basic principles of physical laws, their application to the behavior of objects, and the use of the scientific method in driving advances in this knowledge. This first of two courses (the subsequent course is Introduction to Electromagnetism) will cover the area of physics known as classical mechanics. Classical mechanics is the study of motion based on the physics of Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton. While mathematics is the language of physics, you will only need to be familiar with high school level algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. The small amount of additional math and calculus that we need will be developed during the course.

Quiz PDF eBook: 
Introduction to Mechanics MCQ
Download Mechanics MCQ Quiz PDF eBook
54 Pages
2014
English US
Educational Materials



Sample Questions from the Introduction to Mechanics MCQ Quiz

Question: What are the components of a vector of magnitude 2.5 m at an angle of 120º with respect to the positive x axis?

Choices:

(1.25, -2.16)

(-2.16, 1.25)

(-1.25, -2.16)

(-1.25, 2.16)

Question: How is the work done on an object by a force defined?

Choices:

It is a vector physical quantity with a magnitude of force times the distance over which the force is applied.

It is a vector physical quantity with a magnitude of distance times the component of the force in the direction of the motion.

It is a scalar physical quantity with a magnitude of force times the distance over which the force is applied.

It is a scalar physical quantity with a magnitude of distance times the component of the force in the direction of the motion.

Question: If a 4 kg object slides down a frictionless incline from a height of 1.5 m above the ground, what will be its speed when it reaches the ground?

Choices:

29.4 m/s

16.2 m/s

8.7 m/s

5.4 m/s

Question: What is the definition of power?

Choices:

Power is the amount of work consumed in a particular process.

Power is the amount of work done divided by the time required to do the work.

Power is the product of the work done and the time required to do the work.

Power is the difference in the potential energy of the system before and after a particular process.

Question: A projectile is fired horizontally with a speed of 2 m/s from the top of a 10 m vertical cliff. Which of the following is true?

Choices:

The projectile will hit the ground 1.43 s later at a distance of 2.86 m.

The projectile will hit the ground 1.63 s later at a distance of 2.86 m.

The projectile will hit the ground 1.43 s later at a distance of 2.36 m.

The projectile will hit the ground 1.63 s later at a distance of 2.36 m.

Question: How is the difference between the gravitational potential at a position one meter above the ground and its potential energy on the ground defined?

Choices:

It is equal to the work done by an applied force to move the object from the ground to one meter above the ground.

It is equal to the work done by gravity when the object is moved from the ground to one meter above the ground.

It is equal to the vertical component of to the work done by an applied force to move the object from the ground to one meter above the ground.

It is equal to the vertical component of the work done by gravity when the object is moved from the ground to one meter above the ground.

Question: How is the net work done on an object related to the kinetic energy of the object?

Choices:

The kinetic energy is equal to the net work.

The change in kinetic energy is equal to the net work.

The change in kinetic plus potential energies is equal to the net work.

There is no specific relationship between net work and kinetic energy.

Question: What is the definition of the work done on an object by a force?

Choices:

The change in kinetic energy of the object resulting from the work done

The force exerted times the resultant displacement

The force exerted times the distance over which the force is exerted

The product of component of the force along the line of motion and the distance over which the force is exerted

Question: Which of the following is a non-renewable energy source?

Choices:

Wind

Coal

Geothermal

Solar

Question: What is the work-energy theorem?

Choices:

The work done on an object by non-conservative forces is equal to the change in its kinetic energy.

The work done on an object by a conservative force is equal to the change in its kinetic energy.

The work done on an object by the applied external force is equal to the change in its kinetic energy.

The work done on an object by the net force is equal to the change in its kinetic energy.

Question: Which of the following statements regarding conservative and non-conservative forces is false?

Choices:

The mechanical energy of the system is conserved if the work is done by conservative forces.

Energy is not conserved if work is done by non-conservative forces.

The work done by conservative forces is independent of the path taken.

Friction is a non-conservative force.

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Source:  Introduction to Mechanics. The Saylor Academy 2014, http://www.saylor.org/courses/phys101/
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