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By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Distinguish between kinetic and potential energy, and between exergonic and endergonic chemical reactions
  • Identify four forms of energy important in human functioning
  • Describe the three basic types of chemical reactions
  • Identify several factors influencing the rate of chemical reactions

One characteristic of a living organism is metabolism, which is the sum total of all of the chemical reactions that go on to maintain that organism’s health and life. The bonding processes you have learned thus far are anabolic chemical reactions; that is, they form larger molecules from smaller molecules or atoms. But recall that metabolism can proceed in another direction: in catabolic chemical reactions, bonds between components of larger molecules break, releasing smaller molecules or atoms. Both types of reaction involve exchanges not only of matter, but of energy.

The role of energy in chemical reactions

Chemical reactions require a sufficient amount of energy to cause the matter to collide with enough precision and force that old chemical bonds can be broken and new ones formed. In general, kinetic energy    is the form of energy powering any type of matter in motion. Imagine you are building a brick wall. The energy it takes to lift and place one brick atop another is kinetic energy—the energy matter possesses because of its motion. Once the wall is in place, it stores potential energy. Potential energy is the energy of position, or the energy matter possesses because of the positioning or structure of its components. If the brick wall collapses, the stored potential energy is released as kinetic energy as the bricks fall.

In the human body, potential energy is stored in the bonds between atoms and molecules. Chemical energy is the form of potential energy in which energy is stored in chemical bonds. When those bonds are formed, chemical energy is invested, and when they break, chemical energy is released. Notice that chemical energy, like all energy, is neither created nor destroyed; rather, it is converted from one form to another. When you eat an energy bar before heading out the door for a hike, the honey, nuts, and other foods the bar contains are broken down and rearranged by your body into molecules that your muscle cells convert to kinetic energy.

Chemical reactions that release more energy than they absorb are characterized as exergonic. The catabolism of the foods in your energy bar is an example. Some of the chemical energy stored in the bar is absorbed into molecules your body uses for fuel, but some of it is released—for example, as heat. In contrast, chemical reactions that absorb more energy than they release are endergonic. These reactions require energy input, and the resulting molecule stores not only the chemical energy in the original components, but also the energy that fueled the reaction. Because energy is neither created nor destroyed, where does the energy needed for endergonic reactions come from? In many cases, it comes from exergonic reactions.

Questions & Answers

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Shivu Reply
what is meaning of Anatomy
Shivu
internal structures of body two
Tawheed
Minimum blood pressure
Hasnain Reply
120/80
AmirHameed
90/60
baila
120/80
Sri
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capella Reply
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Sri
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Cris Reply
it's one kind of bacteria
Tariq
the smallest blood vessel is capillary
Richard Reply
How does deoxygenated blood become oxygenated during blood circulation?
Richard
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Piya Reply
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Gifty Reply
is the study of body structure
Amos
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mwiya
What are some of first questions are expected in anatomy and physiology course
Milner Reply
what is pacemaker
mekfira
its a device that is put into the heart to make sure it beats properly
Michelle
SA node produces impulse is called pacemaker
Piya
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Khubaib
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IDDRISU
which of the following is the epithelial tissue that lines the interior of blood vessels?
Firomsa Reply
endothelial tissues
Osaki
Endothelial tissue
mabast
why are the questions only 3
Chisom Reply
you too can ask
Addo
what is the function of the skeletal system?
Cris
what is the treatment of herpes simplex virus?
riad Reply
the long bone with two primary center's of ossification for shaft is ________
Aarambam
medulla
Addo
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Ravi
ha moj ha
Hani
doctor and nurse
Ravi
y 're the questions only 3
Chisom
women are much likely to be pregnant at which stage?
Fatoumatta Reply
There are only six days during any cycle when a woman can get pregnant - the five days leading up to ovulation and the 24 hours after ovulation. This is because sperm can live for up to 5 days in a woman's body, and the ovum lives for only 12-24 hours.
THE
right
Adil
does this apply to women close to menopose
Kuria
what's reason the reason for BP growing ?
Adil
when after they have intercourse
AJ
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William Reply
It's the men version of menopause!
Catia
The testosterone levels decrease
Catia
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Marvin Reply
If our blood sugar drops below 70 mg/dL, we may have symptoms, such as feeling tired, weak, or shaky, become confused or drowsy or even lose consciousness and possibly die.
Dhanya
symptoms of hypoglycemia include: shakiness, dizziness, headache, confusion, rapid pulse rate, sweating, Hunger, etc.
EMERIBE
you right
Khubaib
You become dizzy and weak
evans
giddiness ND week
Sri
Is there any way to disable this chat feature or at least mute notifications? Also, does every textbook app from this creator have the chat function?
Atone Reply
I don't think you can disable chat and yes it is on every app
AJ

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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