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A non-satellite body fulfilling only the first two of the above criteria is classified as “dwarf planet.”

In 2006, Pluto was demoted to a ‘dwarf planet’ after scientists revised their definition of what constitutes a “true” planet.

Orbital data and kepler’s third law
Parent Satellite Average orbital radius r (km) Period T(y) r 3 / T 2 (km 3 / y 2 )
Earth Moon 3.84 × 10 5 size 12{3 "." "84" times "10" rSup { size 8{5} } } {} 0.07481 1 . 01 × 10 19 size 12{1 "." "01" times times "10" rSup { size 8{"18"} } } {}
Sun Mercury 5 . 79 × 10 7 size 12{5 "." "79" times "10" rSup { size 8{7} } } {} 0.2409 3 . 34 × 10 24 size 12{3 "." "34" times "10" rSup { size 8{"24"} } } {}
Venus 1 . 082 × 10 8 size 12{1 "." "082" times "10" rSup { size 8{8} } } {} 0.6150 3 . 35 × 10 24 size 12{3 "." "35" times "10" rSup { size 8{"24"} } } {}
Earth 1 . 496 × 10 8 size 12{1 "." "496" times "10" rSup { size 8{8} } } {} 1.000 3 . 35 × 10 24 size 12{3 "." "35" times "10" rSup { size 8{"24"} } } {}
Mars 2 . 279 × 10 8 size 12{2 "." "279" times "10" rSup { size 8{8} } } {} 1.881 3 . 35 × 10 24 size 12{3 "." "35" times "10" rSup { size 8{"24"} } } {}
Jupiter 7 . 783 × 10 8 size 12{7 "." "783" times "10" rSup { size 8{8} } } {} 11.86 3 . 35 × 10 24 size 12{3 "." "35" times "10" rSup { size 8{"24"} } } {}
Saturn 1 . 427 × 10 9 size 12{1 "." "427" times "10" rSup { size 8{9} } } {} 29.46 3 . 35 × 10 24 size 12{3 "." "35" times "10" rSup { size 8{"24"} } } {}
Neptune 4 . 497 × 10 9 size 12{4 "." "497" times "10" rSup { size 8{9} } } {} 164.8 3 . 35 × 10 24 size 12{3 "." "35" times "10" rSup { size 8{"24"} } } {}
Pluto 5 . 90 × 10 9 size 12{5 "." "90" times "10" rSup { size 8{9} } } {} 248.3 3 . 33 × 10 24 size 12{3 "." "33" times "10" rSup { size 8{"24"} } } {}
Jupiter Io 4 . 22 × 10 5 size 12{4 "." "22" times "10" rSup { size 8{5} } } {} 0.00485 (1.77 d) 3 . 19 × 10 21 size 12{3 "." "19" times "10" rSup { size 8{"21"} } } {}
Europa 6 . 71 × 10 5 size 12{6 "." "71" times "10" rSup { size 8{5} } } {} 0.00972 (3.55 d) 3 . 20 × 10 21 size 12{3 "." "20" times "10" rSup { size 8{"21"} } } {}
Ganymede 1 . 07 × 10 6 size 12{1 "." "07" times "10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 0.0196 (7.16 d) 3 . 19 × 10 21 size 12{3 "." "19" times "10" rSup { size 8{"21"} } } {}
Callisto 1 . 88 × 10 6 size 12{1 "." "88" times "10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 0.0457 (16.19 d) 3 . 20 × 10 21 size 12{3 "." "20" times "10" rSup { size 8{"21"} } } {}

The universal law of gravitation is a good example of a physical principle that is very broadly applicable. That single equation for the gravitational force describes all situations in which gravity acts. It gives a cause for a vast number of effects, such as the orbits of the planets and moons in the solar system. It epitomizes the underlying unity and simplicity of physics.

Before the discoveries of Kepler, Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, and others, the solar system was thought to revolve around Earth as shown in [link] (a). This is called the Ptolemaic view, for the Greek philosopher who lived in the second century AD. This model is characterized by a list of facts for the motions of planets with no cause and effect explanation. There tended to be a different rule for each heavenly body and a general lack of simplicity.

[link] (b) represents the modern or Copernican model. In this model, a small set of rules and a single underlying force explain not only all motions in the solar system, but all other situations involving gravity. The breadth and simplicity of the laws of physics are compelling. As our knowledge of nature has grown, the basic simplicity of its laws has become ever more evident.

In figure a the paths of the different planets are shown in the forms of dotted concentric circles with the Earth at the center with its Moon. The Sun is also shown revolving around the Earth. Each planet is labeled with its name. On the planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn green colored epicycles are shown. In the figure b Copernican view of planet is shown. The Sun is shown at the center of the solar system. The planets are shown moving around the Sun.
(a) The Ptolemaic model of the universe has Earth at the center with the Moon, the planets, the Sun, and the stars revolving about it in complex superpositions of circular paths. This geocentric model, which can be made progressively more accurate by adding more circles, is purely descriptive, containing no hints as to what are the causes of these motions. (b) The Copernican model has the Sun at the center of the solar system. It is fully explained by a small number of laws of physics, including Newton’s universal law of gravitation.

Section summary

  • Kepler’s laws are stated for a small mass m size 12{m} {} orbiting a larger mass M size 12{M} {} in near-isolation. Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are then as follows:

    Kepler’s first law

    The orbit of each planet about the Sun is an ellipse with the Sun at one focus.

    Kepler’s second law

    Each planet moves so that an imaginary line drawn from the Sun to the planet sweeps out equal areas in equal times.

    Kepler’s third law

    The ratio of the squares of the periods of any two planets about the Sun is equal to the ratio of the cubes of their average distances from the Sun:

    T 1  2 T 2  2 = r 1  3 r 2  3 , size 12{ { {T rSub { size 8{1} rSup { size 8{2} } } } over {T rSub { size 8{2} rSup { size 8{2} } } } } = { {r rSub { size 8{1} rSup { size 8{3} } } } over {r rSub { size 8{2} rSup { size 8{3} } } } } } {}

    where T size 12{m} {} is the period (time for one orbit) and r size 12{m} {} is the average radius of the orbit.

  • The period and radius of a satellite’s orbit about a larger body M size 12{m} {} are related by
    T 2 = 2 GM r 3 size 12{T rSup { size 8{2} } = { {4π rSup { size 8{2} } } over { ital "GM"} } r rSup { size 8{3} } } {}

    or

    r 3 T 2 = G 2 M . size 12{ { {r rSup { size 8{3} } } over {T rSup { size 8{2} } } } = { {G} over {4π rSup { size 8{2} } } } M} {}

Questions & Answers

explain how a body becomes electrically charged based on the presence of charged particles
Kym Reply
induction
babar
induction
DEMGUE
definitely by induction
Raymond
induction
Raymond
induction
Shah
induction
Korodhso
please why does a needle sinks in water
DEMGUE
induction
Korodhso
induction
Auwal
what are the calculations of Newton's third law of motiow
Murtala Reply
what is dark matter
apex Reply
(in some cosmological theories) non-luminous material which is postulated to exist in space and which could take either of two forms: weakly interacting particles ( cold dark matter ) or high-energy randomly moving particles created soon after the Big Bang ( hot dark matter ).
Usman
if the mass of a trolley is 0.1kg. calculate the weight of plasticine that is needed to compensate friction. (take g=10m/s and u=0.2)
Declan Reply
what is a galaxy
Maduka Reply
what isflow rate of volume
Abcd Reply
flow rate is the volume of fluid which passes per unit time;
Rev
flow rate or discharge represnts the flow passing in unit volume per unit time
bhat
When two charges q1 and q2 are 6 and 5 coulomb what is ratio of force
Mian Reply
When reducing the mass of a racing bike, the greatest benefit is realized from reducing the mass of the tires and wheel rims. Why does this allow a racer to achieve greater accelerations than would an identical reduction in the mass of the bicycle’s frame?
bimo Reply
is that the answer
nehemiah
why is it proportional
nehemiah Reply
i don't know
Adah
y
nehemiah
what are the relationship between distance and displacement
Usman Reply
They are interchangeable.
Shii
Distance is scalar, displacement is vector because it must involve a direction as well as a magnitude. distance is the measurement of where you are and where you were displacement is a measurement of the change in position
Shii
Thanks a lot
Usman
I'm beginner in physics so I can't reason why v=u+at change to v2=u2+2as and vice versa
Usman
what is kinematics
praveen
kinematics is study of motion without considering the causes of the motion
Theo
The study of motion without considering the cause 0f it
Usman
why electrons close to the nucleus have less energy and why do electrons far from the nucleus have more energy
Theo
thank you frds
praveen
plz what is the third law of thermodynamics
Chidera Reply
third law of thermodynamics states that at 0k the particles will collalse its also known as death of universe it was framed at that time when it waa nt posible to reach 0k but it was proved wrong
bhat
I have not try that experiment but I think it will magnet....
Rev Reply
Hey Rev. it will
Jeff
I do think so, it will
Chidera
yes it will
lasisi
If a magnet is in a pool of water, would it be able to have a magnetic field?.
Stella Reply
yes Stella it would
Jeff
formula for electric current
Chizzy Reply
what is that about pleace
Fokoua
what are you given?
Kudzy
what is current
Fokoua
I=q/t
saifullahi
Current is the flow of electric charge per unit time.
saifullahi
What are semi conductors
saifullahi
materials that allows charge to flow at varying conditions, temperature for instance.
Mokua
these are materials which have electrical conductivity greater than the insulators but less than metal, in these materials energy band Gap is very narrow as compared to insulators
Sunil
materials that allows charge to flow at varying conditions, temperature for instance.
Obasi
wao so awesome
Fokoua
At what point in the oscillation of beam will a body leave it?
Atambiri
what is gravitational force
Adah
what is meant by the term law
Fahd Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, College physics. OpenStax CNX. Jul 27, 2015 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11406/1.9
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