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Answer 32

In Java, the scope can be reduced by placing it within a block of code within the method. The scope extends from the point at which it is declared to the end of the block of code in which it is declared.

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Answer 31

A block of code is defined by enclosing it within curly brackets as shown below

{ ... } .

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Answer 30

The scope of a local variable extends from the point at which it is declared to the end of the block of code in which it is declared.

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Answer 29

In Java, local variables are declared within the body of a method or constructor, or within a block of code contained within the body of a method orconstructor.

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Answer 28

A member variable is a member of a class ( class variable) or a member of an object instantiated from that class ( instance variable). It must be declared within a class, but not within the body of a method orconstructor of the class.

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Answer 27

The scope of a variable places it in one of the following four categories:

  • member variable
  • local variable
  • method parameter
  • exception handler parameter

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Answer 26

The scope of a Java variable is the block of code within which the variable is accessible.

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Answer 25

The rules for Java variable names are as follows:

  • Must be a legal Java identifier consisting of a series of Unicode characters.
  • Must not be the same as a Java keyword and must not be true or false.
  • Must not be the same as another variable whose declaration appears in the same scope.

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Answer 24

In Java, a legal identifier is a sequence of Unicode letters and digits of unlimited length. The first character must be a letter. All subsequentcharacters must be letters or numerals from any alphabet that Unicode supports. In addition, the underscore character ( _ ) and the dollar sign ( $ ) are considered letters and may be used as any character including the first one.

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Answer 23

False. The name of a reference variable evaluates to either null, or to information that can be used to access an object whose reference has been storedin the variable.

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Answer 22

Later versions of Java support either syntax shown in Listing 1 .

Listing 1 . Listing for Answer 22.
class test{ public static void main(String[]args){ Double var1 = 5.5;double var2 = var1.doubleValue(); System.out.println(var2);double var3 = var1; System.out.println(var3);}//end main }//end class test

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Answer 21

The proper syntax for early versions of Java is shown below. Note the upper-case D . Also note the instantiation of a new object of type Double .

Double myWrappedData = new Double(5.5);

Later versions of Java support the following syntax with the new object of type Double being instantiated automatically:

Double myWrappedData = 5.5;

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Answer 20

The proper syntax is shown below. Note the lower-case d .

double myPrimitiveData = 5.5;

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Source:  OpenStax, Object-oriented programming (oop) with java. OpenStax CNX. Jun 29, 2016 Download for free at https://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11441/1.201
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