<< Chapter < Page Chapter >> Page >

Combining internal and external equity

A company that has performed appropriate research has two sets of data. The first is pay structure , the output from the job evaluation. The second is market data , the output from the market survey. The next step will be to combine these two sets of data, to create a pay policy line . The pay policy line can be drawn freehand, by graphing actual salaries and connecting the dots. Alternatively, statistical techniques such as regression analysis are used to create a pay policy line. Regression generates a straight line that best fits the data by minimizing the variance around the line. In other words, the straight line generated by the regression analysis will be the line that best combines the internal value of a job (from job evaluation points) and the external value of a job (from the market survey). You can also enact a policy of “leading” the market by raising the line, and the policy of “lagging” the market by lowering the line.

How do companies decide the pay associated with each job? First, they analyze the content of each job. Second, they assess the value each job contributes to the company. Third, they price each job in the market. Finally, they look at the relationship between what they value internally and what the market values externally. By following each of these steps, a company will have a fair base pay system, which will lead to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Benefits and non-monetary compensation

By Julie Wells

In order for most businesses to function, employees must be provided with a payment in exchange for their services. Cash is one way to compensate employees, but cash alone is rarely enough payment. “Compensation is becoming more variable as companies base a greater proportion of it on stock options and bonuses and a smaller proportion on base salary, not only for executives but also for people further and further down the hierarchy” (Pfeffer, Six Dangerous Myths About Pay, 2000). Benefits and other forms of non-monetary compensation are becoming more appropriate forms of compensation for employees in today’s workplace.

A benefit is a “general, indirect and non-cash compensation paid to an employee” that is offered to at least 80 per cent of staff (Employee Benefits Definition). On average, 40 per cent of payroll is dedicated to non-cash benefits (Kulik, 2004). In order to attract, retain, and motivate the best employees, benefits and other sources of non-monetary compensation should be considered. There are three things a company must fully consider before determining if and how they will issue employee benefits: the industry structure, the strengths of the company and its competitors, and the wage structure. A company should not issue benefits to employees if they have not considered the implications of these factors, specifically the wage structure. If a company offers employees extremely high wages compared to other businesses in the industry in addition to non-monetary compensation, costs may increase at a faster rate than profit. Benefits are also related to the type of industry in which the company does business. If the company has an understanding of what they can offer to employees and how those offerings will be received in the industry, benefits can increase a company’s workforce quality and general happiness of employees.

Get the best Business fundamentals course in your pocket!





Source:  OpenStax, Business fundamentals. OpenStax CNX. Oct 08, 2010 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11227/1.4
Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

Notification Switch

Would you like to follow the 'Business fundamentals' conversation and receive update notifications?

Ask