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Anatomy of the lymphatic system

The left panel shows a female human body, and the entire lymphatic system is shown. The right panel shows magnified images of the thymus and the lymph node. All the major parts in the lymphatic system are labeled.
Lymphatic vessels in the arms and legs convey lymph to the larger lymphatic vessels in the torso.

A major distinction between the lymphatic and cardiovascular systems in humans is that lymph is not actively pumped by the heart, but is forced through the vessels by the movements of the body, the contraction of skeletal muscles during body movements, and breathing. One-way valves (semi-lunar valves) in lymphatic vessels keep the lymph moving toward the heart. Lymph flows from the lymphatic capillaries, through lymphatic vessels, and then is dumped into the circulatory system via the lymphatic ducts located at the junction of the jugular and subclavian veins in the neck.

Lymphatic capillaries

Lymphatic capillaries , also called the terminal lymphatics, are vessels where interstitial fluid enters the lymphatic system to become lymph fluid. Located in almost every tissue in the body, these vessels are interlaced among the arterioles and venules of the circulatory system in the soft connective tissues of the body ( [link] ). Exceptions are the central nervous system, bone marrow, bones, teeth, and the cornea of the eye, which do not contain lymph vessels.

Lymphatic capillaries

This image shows the lymph capillaries in the tissue spaces, and a magnified image shows the interstitial fluid and the lymph vessels. The major parts are labeled.
Lymphatic capillaries are interlaced with the arterioles and venules of the cardiovascular system. Collagen fibers anchor a lymphatic capillary in the tissue (inset). Interstitial fluid slips through spaces between the overlapping endothelial cells that compose the lymphatic capillary.

Lymphatic capillaries are formed by a one cell-thick layer of endothelial cells and represent the open end of the system, allowing interstitial fluid to flow into them via overlapping cells (see [link] ). When interstitial pressure is low, the endothelial flaps close to prevent “backflow.” As interstitial pressure increases, the spaces between the cells open up, allowing the fluid to enter. Entry of fluid into lymphatic capillaries is also enabled by the collagen filaments that anchor the capillaries to surrounding structures. As interstitial pressure increases, the filaments pull on the endothelial cell flaps, opening up them even further to allow easy entry of fluid.

In the small intestine, lymphatic capillaries called lacteals are critical for the transport of dietary lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins to the bloodstream. In the small intestine, dietary triglycerides combine with other lipids and proteins, and enter the lacteals to form a milky fluid called chyle    . The chyle then travels through the lymphatic system, eventually entering the liver and then the bloodstream.

Larger lymphatic vessels, trunks, and ducts

The lymphatic capillaries empty into larger lymphatic vessels, which are similar to veins in terms of their three-tunic structure and the presence of valves. These one-way valves are located fairly close to one another, and each one causes a bulge in the lymphatic vessel, giving the vessels a beaded appearance (see [link] ).

The superficial and deep lymphatics eventually merge to form larger lymphatic vessels known as lymphatic trunks    . On the right side of the body, the right sides of the head, thorax, and right upper limb drain lymph fluid into the right subclavian vein via the right lymphatic duct ( [link] ). On the left side of the body, the remaining portions of the body drain into the larger thoracic duct, which drains into the left subclavian vein. The thoracic duct itself begins just beneath the diaphragm in the cisterna chyli    , a sac-like chamber that receives lymph from the lower abdomen, pelvis, and lower limbs by way of the left and right lumbar trunks and the intestinal trunk.

Questions & Answers

what is partial pressure?
Tariq Reply
it is the pressure exerted by mixture of gases...
Fatukasi
What is the Important of studying anatomy and philosophy
Michael Reply
because to know the mechanisms of our body
Tariq
how many region do we have in human body
nsofor Reply
head thorax abdomen and many kind of...
Shan
what is principal ponatine nucleas
Tariq
Human body can be divided into different regions on the basis of: 1. Systems: e.g. digestive system, respiratory system, excretory system etc.. 2. Parts: e.g. head, thorax, neck, upper limbs, lower limbs etc..
AMEL
we have 9 region in d human body
ZAINAB
what is systematic anatomy?
nsofor Reply
it is the anatomy or study of a certain body system for example the digestive system. or respiratory system.
Summer
It is a group of structure that work together to perform a unique function..
RAPHERA
describe the division of anatomy and physiology
Vissa Reply
the what and the how
Josh
anatomy is the structure. physiology is the function.
Gavin
what is homeostasis?
nsofor
the balance if everything in your body
Kare
is the tendency of the body to maintain the internal environment
Flora
It is the ability of systems and living organisms to adjust its internal environment
RAPHERA
how does a saggital plane look like and a frontal plane
susan Reply
saggital plane divides left and right.. frontal plane divides front and back.. I'm trying to upload a picture but idk how.
Pipiena
tnx sis
Angella
The sagittal plane is a vertical plane that divides the body into left and right anteriorly whilst the frontal plane divides the body into the posterior(back) and anterior(front) parts. They're all perpendicular to the transverse plane.
Sirius
what is a neurones?
Angella Reply
how many systems are there in human
Angella
It is a cell that specialized to conduct nerve impulse
RAPHERA
What is ovulation
Joy Reply
Ovulation is release of mature ovum from ovary
AMEL
what is physiology
Firdaus Reply
The study of how e body systems or structures function and interrelate with each other
Prettygal
what is the composition of the ground substance?
Nana Reply
large carbohydrates and proteins which is known as acid mucopolysacchrides
adam
thanks👍
Nana
you guy welcome
adam
Hi guys am new here
Nji
how does the negative feedback helps in maintaining body temperature at its normal range
dzreke
I need good sites that I can test myself on chapters 1,3,4,5. I have an exam tomorrow
Ana
please can you kindly share your questions here after the exams please
dzreke
What causes the banding pattern seen in the muscle fibril under the electron microscope
Nji
what organelles controls protein synthesis?
Katie Reply
Ribosome
AMEL
hmm...the ribosomes?
Fatukasi
ribosome
adam
Ribosome
Opara
Ribosome
Saifkhan
ribosome
DR
ribosome
ELIZABETH
are ribisomes made in the rRNA?
Lola
nop they are produced by cells of Nucleolus
adam
Is there anything about nerve and muscle physiology?
AMEL Reply
how many types of epithelial tissues do we have
Benedicta Reply
Epithelial tissues are grouped in two ways.. ●Based on the number of layers.(Simple and stratified ) ●Based of their shapes(Squamous,Cuboidal and columnar) Also we can have a combination of the two,say,simple Squamous
Prince
awww thanks dearie😊😊😊💖
Benedicta
describe the function and structure of blood
Belindah Reply
It has four main components: plasma, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Blood has many different functions, including: transporting oxygen and nutrients to the lungs and tissues.
Arlena
well answered arlena.. #thumbs up#
Fatukasi
have u some prepared MCQs on CNS and Special senses physiology?
dr
Anyone got the human heart labelled diagram
Sawmtei
you can download from Google... I don't think it's possible to share docs or files here
Fatukasi
ok thanks
Sawmtei
you're welcome..
Fatukasi
thanks
dr
Thank you
Drs
what's an easy way of knowing the different structures of tissues what they do and where their found
Lola
are you know function of the blood?
Drs
to carry nutrients to parts of the body
Lola
well Lola the easiest way is to attributes the tissues based on their funcs(especially those with similar funcs)..you can create your own mnemonics that will help you rmba em..and the a random reading.. it helps you retain em better
Fatukasi
and try random reading*
Fatukasi
ok thanks
Lola
funtction of WBCs
DR
bone tissue
Waqar
Blood is a fluid connective tissue made up of blood cells suspended in plasma, which is the fluid part of blood. The cell include erthrocytes, leukocytes and thrombocytes. Blood is responsible for transportation of substances around e body eg hormones oxygen and substances
Prettygal
Blood is responsible for defence... As it acts as a defense mechanism against microbes through action of leukocytes which destroy any foreign substances
Prettygal
identy the vein and arteries of coronary circulation
abdifatah Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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