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Veins of the upper limb

This diagram shows the veins present in the upper limb.
This anterior view shows the veins that drain the upper limb.

Veins flowing into the superior vena cava

This flowchart shows the different veins in the body, and how they are connected to the superior vena cava.
The flow chart summarizes the distribution of the veins flowing into the superior vena cava.
Veins of the Upper Limbs
Vessel Description
Digital veins Drain the digits and lead to the palmar arches of the hand and dorsal venous arch of the foot
Palmar venous arches Drain the hand and digits, and lead to the radial vein, ulnar veins, and the median antebrachial vein
Radial vein Vein that parallels the radius and radial artery; arises from the palmar venous arches and leads to the brachial vein
Ulnar vein Vein that parallels the ulna and ulnar artery; arises from the palmar venous arches and leads to the brachial vein
Brachial vein Deeper vein of the arm that forms from the radial and ulnar veins in the lower arm; leads to the axillary vein
Median antebrachial vein Vein that parallels the ulnar vein but is more medial in location; intertwines with the palmar venous arches; leads to the basilic vein
Basilic vein Superficial vein of the arm that arises from the median antebrachial vein, intersects with the median cubital vein, parallels the ulnar vein, and continues into the upper arm; along with the brachial vein, it leads to the axillary vein
Median cubital vein Superficial vessel located in the antecubital region that links the cephalic vein to the basilic vein in the form of a v; a frequent site from which to draw blood
Cephalic vein Superficial vessel in the upper arm; leads to the axillary vein
Subscapular vein Drains blood from the subscapular region and leads to the axillary vein
Axillary vein The major vein in the axillary region; drains the upper limb and becomes the subclavian vein

The inferior vena cava

Other than the small amount of blood drained by the azygos and hemiazygos veins, most of the blood inferior to the diaphragm drains into the inferior vena cava before it is returned to the heart (see [link] ). Lying just beneath the parietal peritoneum in the abdominal cavity, the inferior vena cava    parallels the abdominal aorta, where it can receive blood from abdominal veins. The lumbar portions of the abdominal wall and spinal cord are drained by a series of lumbar veins    , usually four on each side. The ascending lumbar veins drain into either the azygos vein on the right or the hemiazygos vein on the left, and return to the superior vena cava. The remaining lumbar veins drain directly into the inferior vena cava.

Blood supply from the kidneys flows into each renal vein    , normally the largest veins entering the inferior vena cava. A number of other, smaller veins empty into the left renal vein. Each adrenal vein    drains the adrenal or suprarenal glands located immediately superior to the kidneys. The right adrenal vein enters the inferior vena cava directly, whereas the left adrenal vein enters the left renal vein.

From the male reproductive organs, each testicular vein    flows from the scrotum, forming a portion of the spermatic cord. Each ovarian vein    drains an ovary in females. Each of these veins is generically called a gonadal vein    . The right gonadal vein empties directly into the inferior vena cava, and the left gonadal vein empties into the left renal vein.

Questions & Answers

50 prefix and surfix
Martha Reply
why arteries deeper than veins?!
Cismaan Reply
arteries colour of blood is deeper than that of vein because its blood contains oxygen which is adhered to haemoglobin(a protein which gives the blood its red color) , while vein contains deoxygenated blood(blood without oxygen)
olusoga
As we know, vein carries used blood to the heart. when we say used blood, we mean to say, blood that its content(oxygen and other nutrients) has been used up.
olusoga
Arteries are deeper b'cuz they need to be protected.......If they are ruptured they cannot form clot and repair themselves.... Moreover, the pressure of blood is too high for the artery to form the clot and repair itself....... Hence, Arteries are deeper than veins........
AMEL
Than u all. Special thanks too AMEL JEELANI.
Cismaan
You're welcome......
AMEL
Thanks all
describe the location of the macula densa and explain its role in the regulation of renin secretion and in tubuglomerular feedback
mwamba Reply
its located near the vascular pole of the glomurelus also regulate blood pressure and the filtration rate of glomurelus
adam
Describe two early induced responses and what pathogens they affect
olivia Reply
what are pathogens
Priscilla
pathogens are disease-causing agents/organisms
olusoga
pathogen are the causative of disease
Marco
thank you sister
Priscilla
mmmmm
Asad
kkkjjjjjjjhgghkkgkgkkjkjkjgjkhjigjkh
Asad
What are organelles
RAPHERA Reply
The are little organs found in cells of living things... Eg gogi apparatus
Lombe
what is anatomy
Linda Reply
is the study of the structures of the body and how they relates to each other
Agyemang
Anatomy is the study of the structures of body parts and how they relates to each other
Agyemang
is the study of the structure of the body and how they relates to each other
NAOMI
what are the difference between Pacinian corpuscle and cutaneous vascular plexus?
thivya Reply
what are membranous epithelial tissues
Naa Reply
they are the lining and covering epithelial tissues which cover body surfaces and line cavities... they're grouped into simple and stratified according to the number of layers and squamous, cuboidal and columnar according to their shape
Ophelia
what is an acina
Nuella
acina is known to be the basic functional unit of the lungs .(singular:- acinus) this is where the alveoli(the gaseous exchange site) is found...
Fatukasi
what happens to the unfertilized egg
Wuraola
the study of tissues is called
Scandy Reply
histology
Sirius
microscopic or histology anatomy
Shan
What specific types of biological macromolecules do living things require and why?
Marieland Reply
what is partial pressure?
Tariq Reply
it is the pressure exerted by mixture of gases...
Fatukasi
What is the Important of studying anatomy and philosophy
Michael Reply
because to know the mechanisms of our body
Tariq
to discover the regional structural of human body based on physically and also biochemically.
thivya
how many region do we have in human body
nsofor Reply
head thorax abdomen and many kind of...
Shan
what is principal ponatine nucleas
Tariq
Human body can be divided into different regions on the basis of: 1. Systems: e.g. digestive system, respiratory system, excretory system etc.. 2. Parts: e.g. head, thorax, neck, upper limbs, lower limbs etc..
AMEL
we have 9 region in d human body
ZAINAB
what is systematic anatomy?
nsofor Reply
it is the anatomy or study of a certain body system for example the digestive system. or respiratory system.
Summer
It is a group of structure that work together to perform a unique function..
RAPHERA
describe the division of anatomy and physiology
Vissa Reply
the what and the how
Josh
anatomy is the structure. physiology is the function.
Gavin
what is homeostasis?
nsofor
the balance if everything in your body
Kare
is the tendency of the body to maintain the internal environment
Flora
It is the ability of systems and living organisms to adjust its internal environment
RAPHERA

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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