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By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Discuss the mechanisms involved in the neural regulation of vascular homeostasis
  • Describe the contribution of a variety of hormones to the renal regulation of blood pressure
  • Identify the effects of exercise on vascular homeostasis
  • Discuss how hypertension, hemorrhage, and circulatory shock affect vascular health

In order to maintain homeostasis in the cardiovascular system and provide adequate blood to the tissues, blood flow must be redirected continually to the tissues as they become more active. In a very real sense, the cardiovascular system engages in resource allocation, because there is not enough blood flow to distribute blood equally to all tissues simultaneously. For example, when an individual is exercising, more blood will be directed to skeletal muscles, the heart, and the lungs. Following a meal, more blood is directed to the digestive system. Only the brain receives a more or less constant supply of blood whether you are active, resting, thinking, or engaged in any other activity.

[link] provides the distribution of systemic blood at rest and during exercise. Although most of the data appears logical, the values for the distribution of blood to the integument may seem surprising. During exercise, the body distributes more blood to the body surface where it can dissipate the excess heat generated by increased activity into the environment.

Systemic Blood Flow During Rest, Mild Exercise, and Maximal Exercise in a Healthy Young Individual
Organ Resting
(mL/min)
Mild exercise
(mL/min)
Maximal exercise
(mL/min)
Skeletal muscle 1200 4500 12,500
Heart 250 350 750
Brain 750 750 750
Integument 500 1500 1900
Kidney 1100 900 600
Gastrointestinal 1400 1100 600
Others
(i.e., liver, spleen)
600 400 400
Total 5800 9500 17,500

Three homeostatic mechanisms ensure adequate blood flow, blood pressure, distribution, and ultimately perfusion: neural, endocrine, and autoregulatory mechanisms. They are summarized in [link] .

Summary of factors maintaining vascular homeostasis

This flowchart shows the various factors that control the flow of blood. The top panel focuses on autoregulation, and the bottom panel focuses on neural and endocrine mechanisms.
Adequate blood flow, blood pressure, distribution, and perfusion involve autoregulatory, neural, and endocrine mechanisms.

Neural regulation

The nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. The primary regulatory sites include the cardiovascular centers in the brain that control both cardiac and vascular functions. In addition, more generalized neural responses from the limbic system and the autonomic nervous system are factors.

The cardiovascular centers in the brain

Neurological regulation of blood pressure and flow depends on the cardiovascular centers located in the medulla oblongata. This cluster of neurons responds to changes in blood pressure as well as blood concentrations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen ions. The cardiovascular center contains three distinct paired components:

  • The cardioaccelerator centers stimulate cardiac function by regulating heart rate and stroke volume via sympathetic stimulation from the cardiac accelerator nerve.
  • The cardioinhibitor centers slow cardiac function by decreasing heart rate and stroke volume via parasympathetic stimulation from the vagus nerve.
  • The vasomotor centers control vessel tone or contraction of the smooth muscle in the tunica media. Changes in diameter affect peripheral resistance, pressure, and flow, which affect cardiac output. The majority of these neurons act via the release of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine from sympathetic neurons.

Questions & Answers

what is Endocrine system?
Islam Reply
which secrete hormones and other products direct into the blood
Aadi
Cell is basic, structural and functional unit of life
Kabuja Reply
The cell is the structural and functional unit of all living organisms, and is sometimes called the "building block of life." Some organisms, such as bacteria, are unicellular, consisting of a single cell.
Br_
hi am new here..wish to join you in this conversation
Rachel
welcome Rachel am Brianito
hingi
hey
HALLELUYAH
can some one help
HALLELUYAH
what is the basic function of the lymphatic system
HALLELUYAH
The other main function is that of defense in the immune system. Lymph is very similar to blood plasma: it contains lymphocytes. It also contains waste products and cellular debris together with bacteria and proteins. Associated organs composed of lymphoid tissue are the sites of lymphocyte producti
Adnan
the function of lymphatic system are 1fluid balance 2 lipid absorption and 3 defence
Sidra
destroyed microognism
Usman
lymphatic systems main function is to transport lymph
Colleen
may i know the meaning of infestation of parasite?
Aminiely
Which of the following accurately describe external respirations
Robin Reply
different between anatomy and physiology
Samwel Reply
anatomy is the study of STRUCTURE of the body while physiology is the study of the function of the part of the body
Gborgbor
Anatomy deals with the structure and parts of the body while physiology is the function of the the body parts
Archie
not understanding what is a cell
Kesa Reply
its the fundamental unit of life or its the primary step in which two or more cell combine to form a tissue .
Sidra
Is the smallest structural and functional unit of life
Aliyu
cell is the basic you unit of life
Esther
what is osteomalàcia
Ellen Reply
what is hydroxyapitate
Ellen
Hydroxyapatite, also called hydroxylapatite, is a naturally occurring mineral form of calcium apatite with the formula Ca₅(PO₄)₃, but it is usually written Ca₁₀(PO₄)₆(OH)₂ to denote that the crystal unit cell comprises two entities. Hydroxyapatite is the hydroxyl endmember of the complex apatite gro
Br_
..up
Br_
what's the best way to memorize the terms and what it does
Kesa
osteomalacia is where inorganic or mineral which is calcium and phosphorus are removed from a bone....this will make the bone become flexible n in children is called ricket
Rashida
wat work does anatomy do in the hospital and can they get work fast after finishing
SULE Reply
what is the meaning of suture?
praba Reply
it is a protective layer of brain
Madhureddy
it is a kind of non movable joint present between skull bones
neha
suture is an example of fibrous joint and is synatrosys(is not movable)
Rashida
a junction between the sclerites of an imsect's body
Aadi
c organ,organ system, organism
Dorothy Reply
reproductive sytstem
Dorothy
describe structure and functions of spleen
Umesh Reply
why calcium does not prodecessed by biological process?
James Reply
when calcium isn't processed that becomes Calcium Homeostasis
Br_
follow this link for extra info on all processes of calcium including calcium metabolism > ***google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=***opentextbc.ca/anatomyandphysiology/chapter/6-7-calcium-homeostasis-interactions-of-the-skeletal-system-and-other-organ-systems/&ved=2ahUKEwi06LTw-sP
Br_
Copy it and paste it on your browser url
Br_
What are the functions of batholine glan
Aliyu Reply
secretions
Sadia
Of what
Aliyu
what is pathogen
Nafiw Reply
hello
KING
an organism who invades the susceptible host
Mannu
what tenderness chord
KING
Tenderness A She tried to show me how to love D I bit her lips and bruised ...
Lovely
wha
Mannu
is not
KING
Pathogens are decease causing agents.... it can be a viral infection or fungai infection... thank u
Issah
How do we measure power in skeletal muscles....
Terry Reply
what is sternum?
Lovely Reply
pretty much the body/base that holds the ribs also known as breast bone
Ley
well put..
Br_
The sternum or breastbone is a long flat bone located in the center of the chest. It connects to the ribs via cartilage and forms the front of the rib cage, thus helping to protect the heart, lungs, and major blood vessels from injury.
Br_
Is the bone found in between sternal or breast bone.
Peace
I'm new in this A&P who can give information about this
Bin
its a flat bone between the ribs..
Terry
hy
Asi
Hello.. @Asi Deborah
Br_
@Asi Deborah, Do you happen to need any assistance?
Br_
A sturnum... is a bone that joins together with the ribs to form the thoracic cage.... it has the shape of a dagger... thank u
Issah
please can someone explain how diabetes causes cataract
michael
sternum is a flat bone which is in the centre of the thoracic cavity (chest) it connects the true ribs 1_7 directly through cartilages and it protects the heart and the lungs from injury
Rashida
marvelous
adam
pls can parthenogenesis occur in human
adam
no
Nida
nida butool ap pharmacy m ho
Javed

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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